goodpods headphones icon

To access all our features

Open the Goodpods app
Close icon
headphones

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture

Miroslav Volf, Matthew Croasmun, Ryan McAnnally-Linz, Drew Collins, Evan Rosa

Star filled black icon

5.0

(3)

Seeking and living a life worthy of our humanity. Theological insight, cultural analysis, and practical guidance for personal and communal flourishing. Brought to you by the Yale Center for Faith & Culture.
profile image

1 Listener

Star filled black icon

5.0

(3)

not bookmarked icon
Share icon

All episodes

Best episodes

Top 10 For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture Episodes

Best episodes ranked by Goodpods Users most listened

Unimaginable: A Reflection after Uvalde

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture

play

05/30/22 • 10 min

Ryan McAnnally-Linz reflects on the May 24, 2022 school shooting in Uvalde, Texas.

play

05/30/22 • 10 min

profile image

1 Listener

bookmark
plus icon
share episode
play

06/21/22 • 48 min

Seldom do we think of the study of history as a journey of self-discovery. And if that claim has any truth, it's because we modern people tend to see ourselves as autonomous, independent, untethered, and unaffected by our biological and cultural genealogies. But there's a story in our DNA that didn't start with us. And Lisa Sharon Harper has been on a decades-long journey of self-discovery, piecing together her family's lineage from their arrival on America's shores—via slave boats, through the twists and turns of slavery and indentured servitude, through America's post-civil war attempt at Reconstruction, down into the shadowy valley of Jim Crow and twentieth-century Civil Rights struggle, all to her life in the present. Her book is Fortune: How Race Broke My Family and the World—and How to Repair It All. Evan Rosa recently spoke with Lisa at length about how race broke her world and how she traced her family line back beyond the founding of America. And in continued celebration of Juneteenth and the Black joy which has transcended centuries of oppression, the Black history that deserves to be named and known, and the Black freedom which is real and yet still not fully realized and repaired—thanks for listening today friends.

How to Buy Fortune: How Race Broke My Family and the World—and How to Repair It All:

About Lisa Sharon Harper

From Ferguson to New York, and from Germany to South Africa to Australia, Lisa Sharon Harper leads trainings that increase clergy and community leaders’ capacity to organize people of faith toward a just world. A prolific speaker, writer and activist, Ms. Harper is the founder and president of FreedomRoad.us, a consulting group dedicated to shrinking the narrative gap in our nation by designing forums and experiences that bring common understanding, common commitment and common action.

Ms. Harper is the author of several books, including Evangelical Does Not Equal Republican...or Democrat (The New Press, 2008); Left Right and Christ: Evangelical Faith in Politics (Elevate, 2011); Forgive Us: Confessions of a Compromised Faith (Zondervan, 2014); and the critically acclaimed, The Very Good Gospel: How Everything Wrong can be Made Right (Waterbrook, a division of Penguin Random House, 2016). The Very Good Gospel, recognized as the “2016 Book of the Year” by Englewood Review of Books, explores God’s intent for the wholeness of all relationships in light of today’s headlines.

A columnist at Sojourners Magazine and an Auburn Theological Seminary Senior Fellow, Ms. Harper has appeared on TVOne, FoxNews Online, NPR, and Al Jazeera America. Her writing has been featured in CNN Belief Blog, The National Civic Review, Sojourners, The Huffington Post, Relevant Magazine, and Essence Magazine. She writes extensively on shalom and governance, immigration reform, health care reform, poverty, racial and gender justice, climate change, and transformational civic engagement.

Ms. Harper earned her Masters degree in Human Rights from Columbia University in New York City, and served as Sojourners Chief Church Engagement Officer. In this capacity, she fasted for 22 days as a core faster in 2013 with the immigration reform Fast for Families. She trained and catalyzed evangelicals in St. Louis and Baltimore to engage the 2014 push for justice in Ferguson and the 2015 healing process in Baltimore, and she educated faith leaders in South Africa to pull the levers of their new democracy toward racial equity and economic inclusion.

In 2015, The Huffington Post named Ms. Harper one of 50 powerful women religious leaders to celebrate on International Women’s Day. In 2019, The Religion Communicators Council named a two-part series within Ms. Harper’s monthly Freedom Road Podcast “Best Radio or Podcast Series of The Year”. The series focused on The Roots and Fruits of Immigrant Labor Exploitation in the US. And in 2020 Ms. Harper received The Bridge Award from The Selma Center for Nonviolence, Truth and Reconciliation in recognition of her dedication to bridging divides and building the beloved community.

Show Notes

  • “I never really understood the power of family history in scripture until I had done my own family history and understood the power of the context within which people live. So I used to look at the list of names that Jesus came from--Jesus is, you know, son of Mary, son of doo, son of Joseph, depending on who you're reading, and, and this is, and this is his lineage.”
  • “When we look at the context of American life, you cannot divorce it from the laws that were crafted to shape the flow of American life.”
  • Colonial laws legislating mixed-race mar...
play

06/21/22 • 48 min

profile image

1 Listener

bookmark
plus icon
share episode

Julian Reid / Musical Spiritual Hotel: Rest, Hospitality, and Sacred Music

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture

play

10/23/21 • 46 min

Julian Reid explores the way music and scripture can come together to create a sacred space. Extending metaphors of music as architecture and dwelling and spiritual experience as a river, the jazz pianist, producer, writer, and performer explains a recent project of his, "Notes of Rest," combining African-American spirituals with classical hymns for an experience of spiritual hospitality, gratitude, and proclamation of the Gospel into the full spectrum of human experience, in all its pain, frustration, frenzy, stillness, and joy. Throughout the conversation you'll hear Julian play along to accompany his points; he also graciously provided beautiful meditative interludes, much like the kind you'd experience in one of his "Notes of Rest" sessions. Interview by Matt Croasmun.

This episode was made possible in part by the generous support of the Tyndale House Foundation. For more information, visit tyndale.foundation.

Show Notes

  • Click here to learn more about Julian Reid's "Notes of Rest"
  • Introduction: Evan Rosa
  • "God has given us music so that above all it can lead us upwards. Music unites all qualities: it can exalt us, divert us, cheer us up, or break the hardest of hearts with the softest of its melancholy tones. But its principal task is to lead our thoughts to higher things, to elevate, even to make us tremble... The musical art often speaks in sounds more penetrating than the words of poetry, and takes hold of the most hidden crevices of the heart... Song elevates our being and leads us to the good and the true. If, however, music serves only as a diversion or as a kind of vain ostentation it is sinful and harmful." (Friedrich Nietzsche at 14 years old; see Friedrich Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography by Julian Young; h/t Brain Pickings)
  • Bringing together music and scripture
  • Engendering wonder and trust as a seedbed for a life of faith
  • Creating space, the architecture that music creates
  • Weekly liturgical practices
  • The ends and uses of music in sacred spaces
  • Living in a tent, motel—a musical spiritual hotel
  • Scripture is like a cathedral or museum.
  • Performance: "Thank You, Lord"
  • Gratitude—the way we enter into hospitality, "what it means to be hosted by God"
  • Hotel art—the artwork invites and calms rather than jarring and provoking
  • Curiosity vs calmness
  • Invoking a different kind of response
  • Sanitizing the Psalms
  • Performance: "Give Me Jesus"
  • Speaking to different registers
  • Aimed at an encounter with the living God
  • Grace
  • Proclamation: music and preaching
  • Taking risks over the pulpit
  • Karl Barth: "God tempts the church through God's absence."
  • Kerygma: "proclamation"
  • Performance: "Lord, Hear My Prayer" (Taize)
  • Word and Water
  • The metaphor of water utilized in "Notes of Rest"
  • Black musical idioms
  • Finding the use of Contemporary Christian Music (CCM)
  • Balm in Gilead
  • The Hymns of Isaac Watts, colonizing, historical context
  • Combining musical genealogies
  • Braxton Shelly's Healing for the Soul
  • Imaginative fuel from the mystics
  • Cistercian monastics: worshipping in silence and solitude; "a long-standing faith"
  • Performance: "Lord, Hear My Prayer / Give Me Jesus" (Medley)

Introduction (Evan Rosa)

One of the most gripping and influential philosophers of the last 200 years once wrote:

"God has given us music so that above all it can lead us upwards. Music unites all qualities: it can exalt us, divert us, cheer us up, or break the hardest of hearts with the softest of its melancholy tones. But its principal task is to lead our thoughts to higher things, to elevate, even to make us tremble... The musical art often speaks in sounds more penetrating than the words of poetry, and takes hold of the most hidden crevices of the heart... Song elevates our being and leads us to the good and the true. If, however, music serves only as a diversion or as a kind of vain ostentation it is sinful and harmful."

That Friedrich Nietzsche, written when he was 14 years old.

There is plenty of "vain ostentation" in popular music today, and certainly not excluding the music played in church.

But the unitive depth and invitation into transcendence that music offers us of course pairs beautifully with scripture. And whatever else might have changed in Nietzsche's thinking, even at the end of his life in Twilight of the Idols, he suggested that "Without music life would be a mistake. The German imagines even God as a songster." And I say: Well, not just the German, but the human.

In today's episode, ...

play

10/23/21 • 46 min

profile image

1 Listener

bookmark
plus icon
share episode
play

05/28/22 • 16 min

Miroslav Volf has said that every Christian is a theologian. This is important not so much because it demands of an individual Jesus-follower to exert the best of her cognitive abilities, but because it demands of theologians that theology take seriously the experience, perception, and lived realities of human life. As part of our Future of Theology series, Keri Day (Princeton Theological Seminary) joins Matt Croasmun to discuss the purpose and promise of theology today, honing in on this phenomena and the temptation to see theology as an abstract exercise cut off from the particularities of faith.

Keri Day is Associate Professor of Constructive Theology and African American Religion at Princeton Theological Seminary. She’s author of Unfinished Business: Black Women, The Black Church, and the Struggle to Thrive in America as well as Religious Resistance to Neoliberalism: Womanist and Black Feminist Perspectives.

About Keri Day

Keri Day is Associate Professor of Constructive Theology and African American Religion at Princeton Theological Seminary. She’s author of Unfinished Business: Black Women, The Black Church, and the Struggle to Thrive in America as well as Religious Resistance to Neoliberalism: Womanist and Black Feminist Perspectives.

Production Notes

  • This podcast featured Keri Day and Matt Croasmun
  • Edited and Produced by Evan Rosa
  • Hosted by Evan Rosa
  • Production Assistance by Nathan Jowers and Annie Trowbridge
  • Episode Art by Luke Stringer
  • A Production of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture at Yale Divinity School https://faith.yale.edu/about
  • Support For the Life of the World podcast by giving to the Yale Center for Faith & Culture: https://faith.yale.edu/give
play

05/28/22 • 16 min

profile image

1 Listener

bookmark
plus icon
share episode

Eric Gregory / Theology as a Way of Life

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture

play

06/04/22 • 18 min

If we all weren't so cynical, we might expect professional ethicists—or say a professor of ethics or morality at a university—to also be a really morally virtuous and good person. And by extension, you might also expect a theologian to be a person of deeper faith. And that's because intellectual reflection about matters of justice, right and wrong, God and human flourishing all cut to the core of what it means to be human, and the things you discuss in an ethics or theology course, if you took those ideas seriously, just might change the way you live.

Today, in our series on the Future of Theology, Matt Croasmun hosts Eric Gregory, Professor of Religion at Princeton University and author of Politics and the Order of Love: An Augustinian Ethic of Democratic Citizenship. Eric reflects on what it's like to teach theology in a secular institution—the good, the bad, and the ugly of that exercise; the complications of making professors of humanities, ethics, and religion into moral or spiritual exemplars; the centrality of the good life in the purpose of higher education; and the importance of discerning and articulating the multifarious visions of the good life that are presumed by the institutional cultures in which we live, and move, and have our being.

About Eric Gregory

Eric Gregory is Professor of Religion at Princeton University. He is the author of Politics and the Order of Love: An Augustinian Ethic of Democratic Citizenship (University of Chicago Press, 2008), and articles in a variety of edited volumes and journals, including the Journal of Religious Ethics, Modern Theology, Studies in Christian Ethics, and Augustinian Studies. His interests include religious and philosophical ethics, theology, political theory, law and religion, and the role of religion in public life. In 2007 he was awarded Princeton’s President’s Award for Distinguished Teaching. A graduate of Harvard College, he earned an M.Phil. and Diploma in Theology from the University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar, and his doctorate in Religious Studies from Yale University. He has received fellowships from the Erasmus Institute, University of Notre Dame, the Safra Foundation Center for Ethics, Harvard University, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and The Tikvah Center for Law & Jewish Civilization at New York University School of Law. Among his current projects is a book tentatively titled, The In-Gathering of Strangers: Global Justice and Political Theology, which examines secular and religious perspectives on global justice. Former Chair of the Humanities Council at Princeton, he also serves on the the editorial board of the Journal of Religious Ethics and sits with the executive committee of the University Center for Human Values.

Show Notes

  • “Part of the virtue of the humanities, I think, is to kind of dislocate us and to kind of allow us to inhabit different worlds than the ones that we have prior to encountering these texts.”
  • “There is a kind of healthy way in which unifying or directing the task of theology with respect to a particular vision of that good life that will be fleshed out in different ways by different theologies is one way to find a place for the discourse of theology.”
  • “Universities are not just places of the production of information, but are also sites where people seek to ask questions about how they should live. And if universities can't do that, it's very difficult in our current culture to find spaces of reflection that allow that possibility.”
  • “[Universities should have] a desire to shape whole persons and to not just view education as a commodity that we are delivering to customers, but to kind of reconsider what a liberal arts education might look like.”

Production Notes

  • This podcast featured religious ethicist Eric Gregory and biblical scholar Matt Croasmun
  • Edited and Produced by Evan Rosa
  • Hosted by Evan Rosa
  • A Production of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture at Yale Divinity School https://faith.yale.edu/about
  • Support For the Life of the World podcast by giving to the Yale Center for Faith & Culture: https://faith.yale.edu/give
play

06/04/22 • 18 min

profile image

1 Listener

bookmark
plus icon
share episode

Amy Brown Hughes / Hospitable Theology: Space for Questions, Diversity, and Reflection

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture

play

06/11/22 • 17 min

Does your approach to theology bring healing and reconciliation? Does it introduce Christianity as a way of life and peace, flourishing, justice, and shalom? Does your theology have space for diverse and difficult questions to occupy the same space? That kind of hospitable theology would indeed make a difference in our world. Today on the show, we're playing a conversation between Matt Croasmun and Amy Brown Hughes, Associate Professor of Theology at Gordon College and author of Christian Women in the Patristic World. Amy and Matt reflect on the promise and hope of a hospitable theology, grounded in a way of life, sensitive to the difference theology makes for the most pressing issues of our lives today.

About Amy Brown Hughes

Amy Brown Hughes is Associate Professor of Theology at Gordon College. She received her Ph.D. in historical theology with an emphasis in early Christianity from Wheaton College and is the author (with Lynn H. Cohick, Wheaton College) of Christian Women in the Patristic World: Their Influence, Authority and Legacy in the Second Through Fifth Centuries (Baker Academic). Amy also received a M.A. in history of Christianity from Wheaton College and her B.A. in theology and historical studies from Oral Roberts University. While at Wheaton, she worked with the Wheaton Center for Early Christian Studies, which encourages dialogue about the interplay between our modern world and early Christian texts. The overarching theme of Amy’s work as a historical theologian is that early Christian writers continue to be fruitful interlocutors in modern discussions of theology. Her research interests include Eastern Christianity, Trinitarian and Christological thought, Christian asceticism, theological anthropology, the intersection of philosophy and theology, and highlighting the contributions of minority voices to theology, especially those of women. Her dissertation, “‘Chastely I Live for Thee’: Virginity as Bondage and Freedom in Origen of Alexandria, Methodius of Olympus, and Gregory of Nyssa,” explores how early Christian virgins contributed substantively to the development of Christology. She regularly presents papers at the annual meeting of the North American Patristics Society.

Recently, Amy contributed to an edited volume of essays from a symposium on Methodius of Olympus at Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany,Methodius of Olympus: State of the Art and New Perspectives(De Gruyter) and co-authored a series of essays about early Christian writers with George Kalantzis (Wheaton College) for the early Christianity section of a volume for Protestant readers of the Christian tradition (T&T Clark).

Show Notes

  • Brown Hughes’s experience with theology students: “they're making the connection now much more than I've experienced in the past with, oh, this actually has to matter.”
  • A growing hunger for theology in churches: “The stuff that I do is not only mattering pedagogically in the academy for students, but also with the church as well, that it's starting to be something that they're starting to, like, want books and they want things recommended to them.”
  • A discussion of one challenge in modern theology: an inclination for saying "I have more theology on my side or more on this side. And so therefore I'm more right.”
  • A vision of theology: “I feel like theology can be a really hospitable place for people to actually access Christianity, where there are some big ideas and some values there that we can talk about.”
  • Brown Hughes’s vision of a participatory theology focused on the flourishing of life: “with the United Nation's global goals, for instance like gender equality, no poverty, these different goals, they're worldwide conversations about how humans can flourish, largely speaking. So how can theology with how we think about humanity--how can we participate in those conversations? And I think that sort of requiring ourselves to think, "can we actually participate in that conversation" and say, "yes, I think we can." So how can we do that? Like what can we bring to bear on the conversation of eradicating poverty in the world?”
  • Learn more about Gregory of Nyssa
  • A summary of the field: “theology's a little bit wilder, a little bit messier, but I think that's actually an opportunity for the future.”

Production Notes

  • This podcast featured Amy Brown Hughes and Matt Croasmun
  • Edited and Produced by Evan Rosa
  • Hosted by Evan Rosa
  • A Production of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture at Yale Divinity School https://faith.yal...
play

06/11/22 • 17 min

profile image

1 Listener

bookmark
plus icon
share episode

Tyler Roberts / Taking Theology Seriously: A Perspective from Outside Christian Theology

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture

play

04/09/22 • 22 min

Over the past two centuries, colleges have slowly replaced theology departments with religious studies departments. But what happens when theology becomes religious studies? It can produce a more neutral, observational approach that might not fully appreciate the normative claims of religious adherents and their values, commitments, and beliefs.

A careful historical and objective study of religious history and the dimensions of religious practice are deeply valuable. But engaging religious texts and voices without a serious appreciation for the normative elements—that is, the things about a theological or religious idea that means your life would have to change—that would be a problem. It would evacuate the true substance and meaning of theological claims as they're experienced by religious adherents. But it would also fail to form students of religion and the humanities in a way that poses significant challenges to their own lived experience. For living a life worthy of their humanity.

Today, we share a conversation between Tyler Roberts and Matt Croasmun from November 2016. Tragically, Roberts died at the age of 61 on June 3, 2021. He was Professor of Religious Studies at Grinnell College. In this conversation, Roberts reflects on the contribution of theology to the humanities, the role of religious studies in a critical examination of theology, and the importance of appreciating the kinds of theological and moral claims that can change your life. May his memory be a blessing.

Show Notes

  • What happens when theology becomes religious studies?
  • Is serious appreciation missing?
  • How does theology contribute to the humanities?
  • What is going right in Christian theology?
  • Scholars like say what they do ‘is not theology,’ but they have the wrong definition of theology, according to Tyler
  • “We who care about studying religion have ‘dropped the ball’”
  • “It’s helpful to the Church to have external critique”
  • Theology as a straw man
  • What could theology be saying to those outside of the field?
  • “The line between theology as data and theology as something else is pretty blurry”
  • Theology reveals how self-critical religious people are
  • “More interestingly to me is how those of us in religious studies, perhaps the academy more broadly, can learn how to think from theologians”
  • ‘Critical ascent’
  • The humanities can raise great questions, but can they articulate normative positions?
  • Theology and credulity
  • “It’s seemingly either/or, either you’re going to be critical, or you’ll believe anything”
  • How religious people appear credulous in the eyes of the secular
  • But in actuality, theology charts out how we come to our beliefs
  • “There’s nothing particularly blind about this”
  • Hermeneutics of suspicion
  • Students are very good at pointing to the limitations of a text
  • But how can we engage in texts in ways that make students think about their own lives?
  • “That’s a much harder task, and it’s one that many students, I find, aren’t that comfortable with”
  • It’s hard!
  • “Humanities is about reading not just what was true for the author, but what is true for me”
  • “How can we take these texts as real options for us?”
  • Christian theology has an important role to play in the pluralistic conversation
  • How does someone think constructively and critically at the same time? How theologians can teach us that
  • Obituary: Tyler Roberts (1960-2021) (Political Theology)

Production Notes

  • This podcast featured Tyler Roberts and Matt Croasmun
  • Edited and Produced by Evan Rosa
  • Hosted by Evan Rosa
  • Production Assistance by Nathan Jowers and Luke Stringer
  • A Production of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture at Yale Divinity School https://faith.yale.edu/about
  • Support For the Life of the World podcast by giving to the Yale Center for Faith & Culture: https://faith.yale.edu/give
play

04/09/22 • 22 min

profile image

1 Listener

bookmark
plus icon
share episode

N.T. Wright & Miroslav Volf / The Politics of Joy & Suffering in the Now and Not Yet

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture

play

01/22/22 • 23 min

Can we find joy in our world? It's hard enough to find genuine, death-defying joy in the wake of the failure of the modern utopian project, the expectation that human reason and technology and political revolution might save us all. Overlay the malaise of modernity with this dumb pandemic, and the prospects for joy seem bleak. But for N.T. Wright, joy doesn't depend on the whims of circumstance or the proper function of the world. He speaks of the hardy resilience of joy, even in the midst of tragic, terrible, and untimely death. He speaks of the groanings of the Spirit, laboring and working in us even and especially when we can't find the words to explain the circumstances away. Today we're sharing Miroslav Volf's 2014 interview with the New Testament scholar, theologian, and Anglican bishop N.T. Wright. He's the former Bishop of Durham, he's Emeritus Professor University of St Andrews, and is Senior Research Fellow at Wycliffe Hall, Oxford.

NOTE: For the Life of the World is running highlights, readings, lectures, and other best-of features until May 1, 2022, when we'll be back with new conversations.

About

N.T. Wright is a New Testament scholar, theologian, and Anglican bishop. He's the former Bishop of Durham, he's Emeritus Professor University of St Andrews, and is Senior Research Fellow at Wycliffe Hall, Oxford. He's the author of many books, including Surprised by Hope, Paul: A Biography, God and the Pandemic, Simply Christian, The World the New Testament, and many more.

Show Notes

  • The connection between joy and God's deliverance and rescue
  • Joy at what God has done
  • Resurrection joy
  • Navigating "the now and the not yet"
  • What happens to joy in "the now and the not yet"
  • Waiting, suffering, and joy
  • Acts 12: James is killed by Herod's men, and Peter gets out of jail free
  • Differentiating types of suffering
  • Romans 8: The whole creation groaning as a woman in childbirth
  • 2 Corinthians 2:1-7 (NRSV) / So I made up my mind not to make you another painful visit. 2For if I cause you pain, who is there to make me glad but the one whom I have pained? 3And I wrote as I did, so that when I came, I might not suffer pain from those who should have made me rejoice; for I am confident about all of you, that my joy would be the joy of all of you. 4For I wrote to you out of much distress and anguish of heart and with many tears, not to cause you pain, but to let you know the abundant love that I have for you. 5 But if anyone has caused pain, he has caused it not to me, but to some extent—not to exaggerate it—to all of you. 6This punishment by the majority is enough for such a person; 7so now instead you should forgive and console him, so that he may not be overwhelmed by excessive sorrow.
  • "Yet behold: Here I am"
  • I have no idea what's going on, but I believe.
  • N.T. Wright on the presiding over his father's funeral
  • The death of a child: there is no
  • Early church love is "agape"—holistic love
  • The emotive dimensions of joy
  • What kind of seeing is involved in rejoicing?
  • "All authority on heaven and earth has been given to me."
  • "It's a matter of thinking into the world in which divine authority is constituted by self-giving love."
  • Jesus on a donkey vs. Pontius Pilate on a war horse—the redefinition of power and authority
  • "Religion is what you do to keep the fabric of society together."
  • Treating Christianity as a private matter
  • Is there any joy in the world today?
  • The confused world that comes from believing the utopian lie of modernity

Production Notes

  • This podcast featured New Testament Scholar N.T. Wright and theologian Miroslav Volf
  • Edited and Produced by Evan Rosa
  • Hosted by Evan Rosa
  • Production Assistance by Martin Chan
  • A Production of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture at Yale Divinity School https://faith.yale.edu/about
  • Support For the Life of the World podcast by giving to the Yale Center for Faith & Culture: https://faith.yale.edu/give
play

01/22/22 • 23 min

profile image

1 Listener

bookmark
plus icon
share episode
play

05/21/22 • 30 min

Jesus's teaching to be in but not of the world (John 17:14-15) has gone from a mode of prophetic witness that could lead to martyrdom, to bumper sticker ethics that either feeds the trolls or fuels the tribe. We're in a moment where the ways that Christianity's influence on culture—and vice versa—are writ large and undeniable. And yet, how are we to understand it? How are we to live in light of it? How does that relationship change from political moment to political moment? In this conversation, ethicist Luke Bretherton (Duke Divinity School) joins Matt Croasmun to reflect on the purpose of theology as a way of life committed to loving God and neighbor; the essential virtue of listening and its role in public theology; the interrelation between Church and World; the temptation to see the other as an enemy to be defeated rather than a neighbor to be loved; and how best to understand secularism and religiosity today.

Show Notes

  • Do you call yourself a theologian?
  • “You can't understand the water you're swimming in without understanding something of the theological frameworks that have helped shape it”
  • Where does the idea that our contemporary context is secular come from?
  • “The world is as furiously religious as ever”
  • People think that our modern age is like a shower, that we can just “step into the shower and be washed clean from the foul accretions of superstition and step out enlightened, rational men and women,” but we're actually in a ‘jacuzzi’ of ideas
  • The internet and plurality of opinion
  • What happens when we step away from the institutional framework of the Church?
  • “Who tells the children what Christianity is, who tells the children, what Islam is?”
  • Do you actually want to show up on a Sunday?
  • Then tension between believing and belonging
  • Sacrality and its many guises
  • “The many forms of life which we don't necessarily name as religious, but they're functioning in that way”
  • How do we name them?
  • If you talk to an atheist, they feel marginalized in this country, but if you talk to an Evangelical Christian they feel the same way
  • “Everyone feels under threat, whether you're a humanist or an atheist or a Christian or Muslim”
  • “But if you take the victim view, it generates a failure of imagination, a failure of patience, and a failure of paying attention”
  • Churches talk a lot about how to speak but not about how to listen
  • “What does Christian listening look like in a pluralistic context?”
  • Learning something about God by talking to an atheist
  • Listening is pointing to what is already there: “We point to what Christ and the Spirit are already doing. And it is a privilege is to participate in that.”
  • What is truth?
  • “It is how well you love God and neighbor. And the apprehension of the truth is measured by the quality of the relationships”
  • “So, I think faith begins with hearing and listening first”
  • What’s right with theology?
  • How can we have a synthesis of tradition and critique?
  • Having a sensitivity to political order and whether it is constructive or destructive is theological work
  • Epistemic humility and interdisciplinary study
  • The beauty in becoming aware of what you don’t know
  • What is the state of the field right now?
  • The overemphasis on the hermeneutics of suspicion, and the world as it is versus the world as it should be
  • Cynicism and redundancy
  • “If all we’re saying is that wolves eat sheep, well, we kind of knew that already”
  • What is a realistic hopefulness? What does ‘the world as it should be’ feel, taste, smell like?
  • What is the purpose of theology?
  • It “articulates what it means to heal a particular form of life in the light of who we understand God to be”
  • “There shouldn't be an over-inflation of what theology, as a technical act, does. But neither is it nothing”
  • “It is a cultivation of a faithful, hopeful and loving way of being alive”

About Luke Bretherton

Luke Bretherton is Robert E. Cushman Distinguished Professor of Moral and Political Theology and senior fellow of the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University. Before joining the Duke faculty in 2012, he was reader in Theology & Politics and convener of the Faith & Public Policy Forum at King's College London. His latest book is Christ and the Common Life: Political Theology and the Case for Democracy (Eerdmans, 2019). His other books include Resurrecting Democracy: Faith, Citizenship and the Politics of a Common Life (Cambridge University Press, 2015), which was based on a four-year ethnographic study of broad-based community organizing initiatives in London and elsewhere; Christianity & Contemporary Politics: The Conditions and Possibilities o...

play

05/21/22 • 30 min

profile image

1 Listener

bookmark
plus icon
share episode

How do you heal from trauma—whether individual, familial, or collective? Can Christian spirituality help?

The tumultuous time we find ourselves in serves up regular doses of the suffering and pain of others—war wages destruction, migrants are left to die of heat exposure, hate crimes based in bigotry and fear of ethnicity or orientation or identity leave us all feeling numbed to our humanity; and with the aid of our phones, we even risk a dependency relationship with that trauma. It's constantly leveraged for political gain, power, money, or ugly fame. If we see the game of human culture as a zero-sum struggle for power, someone's political gain is always another's loss. Someone's joy another's sorrow.

How are we supposed to find our human siblings? Add to this the unspoken trauma that haunts so many of us—myself, you listeners, that person in your life who seems strong and impervious to harm—we all carry our lifetime's worth of trauma even if we act like it's not there. But as Bessel Vander Kolk's best selling title captures so well, even when your conscious mind does that surreptitious work to ignore, deny, suppress, or forget trauma—"the body knows the score." But perhaps so too the spirit knows the score.

Today, Bo Karen Lee joins Ryan McAnnally-Linz for a conversation on trauma and Ignatian spirituality. Bo is Associate Professor of Spiritual Theology and Christian Formation at Princeton Theological Seminary, and has written and taught contemplative theology, prayer, and the connection between spirituality and social justice.

This conversation is a beautiful and sensitive—and sometimes quite raw—exploration of trauma and the human experience. But the clarity and courage reflected in Bo's presentation of how trauma threatens the human mind and body is matched by a powerful empathy and peace, as she reflects on moving through a spiritual journey from victim or bystander of trauma to a beloved, seen, known, and loved by God and other deeply caring helpers. The discussion that follows offers a concise introduction to the Ignatian spiritual tradition, as well as a holistic comment on how trauma at the individual, genetic, family, and national level can be acknowledged, addressed, and acted on.

This episode was made possible in part by the generous support of the Tyndale House Foundation. For more information, visit tyndale.foundation.

About

Bo Karen Lee, ThM '99, PhD '07, is associate professor of spiritual theology and Christian formation at Princeton Theological Seminary. She earned her BA in religious studies from Yale University, her MDiv from Trinity International University in Deerfield, Illinois, and her ThM and PhD from Princeton Seminary. She furthered her studies in the returning scholars program at the University of Chicago, received training as a spiritual director from Oasis Ministries, and was a Mullin Fellow with the Institute of Advanced Catholic Studies. Her book, Sacrifice and Delight in the Mystical Theologies of Anna Maria van Schurman and Madame Jeanne Guyon, argues that surrender of self to God can lead to the deepest joy in God. She has recently completed a volume, The Soul of Higher Education, which explores contemplative pedagogies and research strategies. A recipient of the John Templeton Award for Theological Promise, she gave a series of international lectures that included the topic, “The Face of the Other: An Ethic of Delight.”

She is a member of the Presbyterian Church (USA), the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women, and the American Academy of Religion; she recently served on the Governing Board of the Society for the Study of Christian Spirituality, and is on the editorial board of the journal, Spirtus, as well as on the steering committee of the Christian Theology and Bible Group of the Society of Biblical Literature. Before joining Princeton faculty, she taught in the Theology Department at Loyola College in Baltimore, Maryland, where she developed courses with a vibrant service-learning component for students to work at shelters for women recovering from drug addiction and sex trafficking. She now enjoys teaching classes on prayer for the Spirituality and Mission Program at Princeton Seminary, in addition to taking students on retreats and hosting meditative walks along nature trails.

Production Notes

  • This podcast featured Bo Karen Lee and Ryan McAnnally-Linz
  • Edited and Produced by Evan Rosa
  • Hosted by Evan Rosa
  • Production Assistance by Annie Trowbridge and Luke Stringer
  • Special thanks to the Tyndale House Foundation for their generous support.
  • A Production of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture at Yale Divinity School https://faith.yale.edu/about
  • Support For the Life of the World podcast by giving to the Yale Center for Faith &amp...
play

06/29/22 • 38 min

profile image

1 Listener

bookmark
plus icon
share episode

Show more

Toggle view more icon

FAQ

How many episodes does For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture have?

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture currently has 160 episodes available.

What topics does For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture cover?

The podcast is about Culture, Christianity, Theology, Society & Culture, Spirituality, Love, Wisdom, Religion & Spirituality, Podcasts, Forgiveness, Philosophy and Life.

What is the most popular episode on For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture?

The episode title 'Unimaginable: A Reflection after Uvalde' is the most popular.

What is the average episode length on For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture?

The average episode length on For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture is 38 minutes.

How often are episodes of For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture released?

Episodes of For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture are typically released every 7 days.

When was the first episode of For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture?

The first episode of For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture was released on Mar 28, 2020.

Show more FAQ

Toggle view more icon

Comments

5.0

out of 5

Star filled grey IconStar filled grey IconStar filled grey IconStar filled grey IconStar filled grey Icon
Star filled grey IconStar filled grey IconStar filled grey IconStar filled grey Icon
Star filled grey IconStar filled grey IconStar filled grey Icon
Star filled grey IconStar filled grey Icon
Star filled grey Icon

3 Ratings