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Critical Distance Podcasts - CUE Art Foundation

CUE Art Foundation

Critical Distance is a podcast series produced by the CUE Art Foundation as a part of Meeting Artists' Needs, a professional development education series for artists of all ages and backgrounds. We believe that artists are entrepreneurs, an essential part of our country's culture and economy. Meeting Artists' Needs aims to equip artists with the skills and knowledge they need—from networking and marketing to financial and estate planning—so they can effectively manage a successful career in the arts.
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How does it all add up? Evaluation is an important aspect of any social practice. It provides valuable feedback for an artist wishing to hone their craft, and is a necessary part of funding proposals. To conclude the series, this conversation will introduce the basics of program evaluation and how it helps create meaningful connection between artists and their audiences.

This program is the fifth in the series Make Some Place: conversations about people, practice, and creative placemaking. This series is presented by CUE, and produced by our 2016 Public Programming Fellows, Jordan Dyniewski and perryne lee poy lokhandwala. The Make Some Place series is a part of Meeting Artists' Needs.

Recorded live October 12, 2016.

FEATURED GUESTS:
Rupal Sanghvi, Founder, HealthxDesign
+ Jamie Hand, Research Director, ArtPlace America

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How do we make it sustainable (i.e. “get paid”)? The core purpose of creative placemaking is nothing new. However, new funding sources are increasingly becoming available, providing critical support to placemaking efforts. From grants to crowdfunding, and through private and public partnerships, artists will learn about these funding opportunities and what makes for compelling proposals.

This program is the fourth in the series Make Some Place: conversations about people, practice, and creative placemaking. This series is presented by CUE, and produced by our 2016 Public Programming Fellows, Jordan Dyniewski and perryne lee poy lokhandwala. The Make Some Place series is a part of Meeting Artists' Needs.

Recorded live at The Bronx Museum of the Arts, October 5, 2016.

FEATURED GUESTS:
Javier Torres, Director of National Grantmaking, Artplace America
ArtPlace America is a ten-year project that exists to position art and culture as a core sector of comprehensive community planning and development in order to strengthen the social, physical, and economic fabric of communities. In his role F. Javier Torres is responsible for building a comprehensive set of demonstration projects that illustrate the many ways in which arts and culture can strengthen the processes and outcomes of the planning and development field across the United States.

Prior to his role at ArtPlace, Javier was Senior Program Officer for Arts and Culture at the Boston Foundation where he led an exploration of the role of culture as a tool for transformation, sustainability, and as central to the development of vibrant communities. Javier spent six years as the Director of Villa Victoria Center for the Arts, a program of IBA, a community based multi-disciplinary arts complex that operates as a regional presenter and local programmer for Latino arts. Currently, he is a board member for Grantmakers in the Arts and an advisory board member for the Design Studio for Social Intervention.

+ Kayhan Irani, Artist & Community Event Producer. www.artivista.org/about/
Kayhan Irani is an Emmy-award winning writer, a producer, and a Theater of the Oppressed trainer. She creates art, media and live events to build community and engage audiences in social justice issues. Kayhan facilitates workshops, trainings, and consults NGOs, government agencies, and community organizations in using story-based strategies for mobilization, engagement, and building diversity. She was one of ten artists named as a 2016 White House Champion of Change for her art and storytelling work. Her work has been supported by the BBC World Service Trust, The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Bronx Council for the Arts, NYFA, The National Parks Service, and the American Society for Muslim Advancement. Kayhan's published work includes Telling Stories to Change the World: Global Voices on the Power of Narrative to Build Community and Make Social Justice Claims and Culturally Relevant Arts Education for Social Justice: A Way Out of No Way. She is a board member of freeDimensional, an organization helping artists around the world who are targeted because of their art.

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Community partnerships and collaborations are key elements to the creative placemaking process. By combining resources, the process is inclusive of different viewpoints often leading to vibrant and more sustainable results. From local to international communities, discover how partners can enhance your practice.

This program is the third in the series Make Some Place: conversations about people, practice, and creative placemaking. This series is presented by CUE, and produced by our 2016 Public Programming Fellows, Jordan Dyniewski and perryne lee poy lokhandwala. The Make Some Place series is a part of Meeting Artists' Needs.

Recorded live September 28, 2016.

FEATURED GUESTS:
Sunny Widmann, Director, National Arts Strategies
As Director at National Arts Strategies, Sunny gets to pursue her passion of designing transformational experiences that help people in the cultural sector see their work through a new lens. Programs currently in Sunny’s portfolio include support services for cultural entrepreneurs (Creative Community Fellows), leadership development for CEOs (Chief Executive Program) and a variety of online initiatives.
Sunny joined the NAS team in 2009. Prior to that she served with the Peace Corps in Togo, West Africa as a Girls Education and Empowerment volunteer, where she co-founded a women’s community group focused on literacy, health and micro-lending. She completed her undergraduate studies at Butler University and holds a graduate degree in Arts Management from American University. Her work has been published in the Journal of Arts Management, Law and Society. She lives in Washington DC with her husband Michael and dog Lucy.
+ Bridget Bartolini, Founder, Five Boro Story Project
Bridget Bartolini is a socially engaged artist and educator who uses story-sharing to strengthen community connections. Inspired by her love for New York City, her belief in the power of storytelling as a tool for social justice, and her frustration with the lack of cultural programming in areas like her home neighborhood in Queens, Bridget launched the Five Boro Story Project in 2013. Under the Five Boro Story Project, she produces community storytelling events that bring New Yorkers together through sharing true stories and art inspired by our neighborhoods. Her creative process involves working with community members, activists, and artists to collaboratively create tributes to the people and places that make up our homes. Bridget holds a Masters in Community Education from Columbia University’s Teachers College, and was a 2013 Create Change Fellow and 2014 Commissioned Artist with The Laundromat Project, and a 2015-16 Creative Community Fellow with National Arts Strategies. She is currently an artist in residence with More Art’s Engaging Artists 2016 Housing Justice Residency.

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A benefit of socially engaging art is that it often takes place in unexpected, publicly­-accessible spaces. For example, by bringing art to community gardens, parks and public plazas, we create connection among neighbors and more vibrant neighborhoods. This conversation will uncover the plethora of community spaces and resources available to artists, while also addressing site­ specific work and contextual considerations.

This program is the second in the series Make Some Place: conversations about people, practice, and creative placemaking. This series is presented by CUE, and produced by our 2016 Public Programming Fellows, Jordan Dyniewski and perryne lee poy lokhandwala. The Make Some Place series is a part of Meeting Artists' Needs.

Recorded live at Brooklyn Navy Yard, BLDG 92 on September 21, 2016.

FEATURED GUESTS:
David Koren, FIGMENT
David is the Founder, Executive Producer, and Executive Director of FIGMENT, a participatory arts event that now takes place in 12 cities in 4 countries. FIGMENT was founded on Governors Island in New York Harbor in 2007 on the belief that everyone has the capacity to be creative, and that art is something that everyone can create and interact with. The NYC event has grown dramatically, and now welcomes 25,000 participants each year who engage with 200 arts projects. The Village Voice has named FIGMENT NYC the Best Art Festival in New York City. BBC Travel has written, “If Figment were a country, it would be the happiest in the world – and I would apply for citizenship immediately.” David’s new book, FIGMENT (What is this? Why is nothing for sale? Why is everyone smiling?) is available as a softcover and ebook on Amazon.com.

+ Risa Puno, Artist. Creator of the "Common Picnic" last summer that was part of FIGMENT's summer­long sculpture program on Governors Island. www.risapuno.com

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What is ‘creative placemaking’? The term has emerged from the field of community planning and development to describe how arts and culture play a vital role in shaping community places. The series begins by establishing some common language and definition around the term ‘creative placemaking’. We will discuss the concept, its importance to artists and communities, and review examples.

This program is the first in the series Make Some Place: conversations about people, practice, and creative placemaking. This series is presented by CUE, and produced by our 2016 Public Programming Fellows, Jordan Dyniewski and perryne lee poy lokhandwala. The Make Some Place series is a part of Meeting Artists' Needs.

Recorded live September 14, 2016.

FEATURED GUESTS:
Ellen Ryan, Senior Director of Strategy and Planning, Fairmount Park Conservancy
Ellen Ryan currently works at the Fairmount Park Conservancy. Trained as an urban planner, Ellen has over 20 years of experience working in the public and not-for-profit sectors and has held leadership positions in a number of parks and urban planning organizations. Most recently she was the Kresge Fellow for Creative Placemaking at The Trust for Public Land. Previously she served as Executive Director of Open House New York, Vice President of Strategic Partnerships for Brooklyn Bridge Park in Brooklyn, NY and Director of Governmental Affairs at the NYC Department of City Planning. Ellen’s keen interest is the intersection of communities, parks and culture and the role a vibrant civic realm plays in individual lives.

+ Musa Hixson, Artist & Founder of Brooklyn Art Incubator.
Musa Hixson is a multidisciplinary artist. His art explores the correlations existing between repetitive codes of information uncovered in scientific research and the various structural patterns, which occur in our everyday environment. Combining various materials with existing found objects; his multifarious art reflects assemblage, sculpture and large-scale immersive installations.

Musa was selected as artist-in-residence at Wave Hill, Winter Workspace, Bronx, New York in 2015, at The 3-D foundation, Verbier Switzerland, Obama City Art Residency, Obama Japan, Vermont Studio Center and Virginia Center for Creative Arts. In 2014 he received an artist development grant from the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art / Rockefeller Foundation. He has taught at a number of Universities, including CUNY, College of New Rochelle, and New Jersey City University.

In 2003, he founded Brooklyn Art Incubator with a mission to serve needed communities through the Arts. Presently, Musa is very interested in the future of art’s relationship with and it’s responsibility to the natural environment.

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How do artists use their social media accounts as art mediums and platforms through which to produce work? What alternative purposes, if any, might online galleries and “Instagram residencies” serve artists, particularly emerging artists?

To consider these topics, join CUE for a conversation with Yulan Grant and Camilo Godoy, two multidisciplinary artists utilizing social media to create work that responds to contemporary discourse. Moderated by Justin Allen, CUE Art Foundation Programs Assistant.

Artist Bios:

Yulan Grant is a New York-based multidisciplinary artist from Kingston, Jamaica. A creative positioned between Caribbean and American culture, her work interrogates ideas of identity, notions of power, perceived histories, and the entanglements that happen within these topics. Grant is interested in the role that new media plays in artistic practices and the dialogue they hope to create.
Instagram: @yu_who

DATABASE is an ongoing network that aims to document people of colour killed by extrajudicial forces beginning in the year 2012. Access the network here.

Camilo Godoy was born in Bogotá, Colombia and currently lives in New York. He received a BFA from Parsons The New School for Design in 2012 and a BA from Eugene Lang College The New School for Liberal Arts in 2013. Utilizing a multidisciplinary art practice, his work is concerned with examining the construction of political and social meanings. Godoy was a 2012-2013 Queer Art Mentorship fellow; a 2014 EMERGENYC fellow at The Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics at NYU; a 2014-2015 Keyholder Resident at the Lower East Side Printshop; and is currently a 2015 Movement Research Artist-in-Residence. Godoy’s work has been presented at venues such as La Mama Galleria, New York; Queens Museum, New York; Donaufestival, Krems; and Mousonturm, Frankfurt, among others.

Instagram: @camilogodoy


Recorded live September 29, 2015 as a part of Meeting Artists' Needs

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New York has long been a center for art and cultural activity of international and historic significance. As NYC residents and independent businesses are pushed out of neighborhoods by rising rents, the art community is quickly losing access to work space and the infrastructure needed for production and the transfer of ideas. Can New York City remain a hub for artists and creative businesses? Are there measures that can be taken to protect neighborhoods from displacement? The Artist Studio Affordability Project discuss their activism and ways that artists can strengthen their claim to space in New York.
The Artist Studio Affordability Project focuses on raising awareness about the crisis of affordable studio space, and on advocating legislation that will protect and expand affordable artist studios. To that end, ASAP engages in outreach to the art community, elected officials, community organizations, news media, and policy experts in order to shape and define their approach.

This program is the fifth in the series if it's not work it must be PLAY: discussions on the state of work in the arts. This series is presented by CUE, and produced by our inaugural Public Programming Fellow, Cevan Castle. The PLAY series is a part of Meeting Artists' Needs.

Recorded live June 2, 2015.

Event Handouts:

Let the S.B.J.S.A. finally come up for a vote! The Villager, March 2015

Engines of Opportunity: Reinvigorating New York City’s Manufacturing Zones for the 21st Century, Published by the New York City Council, November 2014

Artist Studio Affordability Project letter

Links and references:

Small Business Jobs Survival Act (SBJSA)
http://www.artiststudioaffordabilityproject.org/sbjsa/
http://savenycjobs.org/jobs-survival-act

NYC Real Estate Investment Cooperative (NYC REIC)
http://nycreic.com/meet/

Industry City
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/09/arts/design/rising-rents-leave-new-york-artists-out-in-the-cold.html?_r=0

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Left to right: Cevan Castle, Tom Angotti, Rosanne Haggerty and Paul Parkhill

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Do our communities also bear the negative effects of under-compensated creative labor? Artists famously move residences and work space in response to the availability of low-cost space, often subsidized by development schemes. Tom Angotti of Hunter College Center for Community Planning and Development, Rosanne Haggerty of Community Solutions, and Paul Parkhill of Spaceworks discuss strategies towards long term creative space and community stability.

This program is the fourth in the series "if it's not work it must be PLAY: discussions on the state of work in the arts." This series is presented by CUE, and produced by our inaugural Public Programming Fellow, Cevan Castle. For more information, please visit Critical Distance, a new blog produced by CUE highlighting discussions, near and far, on issues relating to the arts and humanities.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Tom Angotti is Professor of Urban Affairs and Planning at Hunter College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York, and Director of the Hunter College Center for Community Planning and Development. His recent books include The New Century of the Metropolis, New York For Sale: Community Planning Confronts Global Real Estate, which won the Davidoff Book Award, andAccidental Warriors and Battlefield Myths. He is co-editor of Progressive Planning Magazine, and Participating Editor for Latin American Perspectives and Local Environment. He is actively engaged in community and environmental justice issues in New York City.

Rosanne Haggerty is the President and Chief Executive Officer of Community Solutions. She is an internationally recognized leader in developing innovative strategies to end homelessness and strengthen communities. In 1990, Rosanne founded Common Ground Community, a pioneer in the development of supportive housing and research-based practices that end homelessness. To have greater impact, Rosanne and our senior team launched Community Solutions in 2011 to help communities solve the problems that create and sustain homelessness. Rosanne is a MacArthur Foundation Fellow, an Ashoka Senior Fellow and a Hunt Alternative Fund Prime Mover. In 2012, she was awarded a Jane Jacobs medal for new ideas and activism from the Rockefeller Foundation. She serves on the boards of the Alliance for Veterans, Citizens Housing and Planning Council and Iraq-Afghanistan Veterans of America.

Paul Parkhill became Spaceworks’ founding Executive Director in May 2012. Between 1999 and 2012, Paul served as the Director of Planning and Development at the Greenpoint Manufacturing and Design Center, a nonprofit that has redeveloped more than 700,000 square feet of space for industrial, artisanal and arts-related businesses. For six years prior to that Paul worked as a housing developer for Common Ground Community, a supportive housing provider. In 1997 Paul co-founded Place in History, a Brooklyn-based nonprofit arts organization that sponsors public art and public history projects about New York City neighborhoods. He has performed community development consulting for a range of organizations, including the Fifth Avenue Committee, Asian Americans for Equality, the Corporation for Supportive Housing, Civic Builders and the Greyston Foundation. Paul holds a BA from Brown University and a Master’s Degree in Urban Planning from Columbia University.

Recorded live: March 6th, 2015.

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New York based advocacy and support group hosts, The Artists Financial Support Group, will share their mission to strengthen the financial circumstances of the creative community, through financial self-advocacy, change in the cost of artist education, and innovative ways to manage student loan debt and to budget on an erratic income.

About The Artists Financial Group

HISTORY
In the fall of 2010, several alumni of the NYU Graduate Acting Program met in New York. After graduating from one of the foremost artistic training programs in the country, we found ourselves working in the arts, and yet struggling with debt and student loans. We were beginning to realize that we might not be able to afford to be artists, simply because we had gone to school to be artists. Attempting to leave shame and panic aside, we started the Artists Financial Support Group (AFSG). We wrote a book, A Financial Handbook for the Artist, and prepared a workshop for the next NYU graduating class. Our goal was to share with those students everything we wished someone had told us when we finished graduate school. We did just that in May of 2011 when we gave our first workshop at NYU. The AFSG has since led workshops at NYU Grad Acting, NYU Grad Design for Stage and Film, Yale School of Drama, Juilliard, Actors Fund, SAG Foundation, Long Beach State University, and Christopher Newport University.

MISSION STATEMENT
The Artists Financial Support Group seeks to: 1) Educate student and professional artists on financial self-advocacy 2) Advocate legislative and institutional change in the cost of artist education and 3) Innovate new ways to manage student loan debt and to budget on an erratic income.

ELEVATOR PITCH
For artists who fear they'll never understand money or finance, the AFSG is a financial guide that hopes to inspire young talent by making them more confident about money, because only the AFSG understands the financial mistakes that can hinder the growth of up-and-coming artists.


This program is the third in the series "if it's not work it must be PLAY: discussions on the state of work in the arts." This series is presented by CUE, and produced by our inaugural Public Programming Fellow, Cevan Castle. For more information, please visit Critical Distance, a new blog produced by CUE highlighting discussions, near and far, on issues relating to the arts and humanities. The PLAY series is part of Meeting Artists' Needs.

Recorded live January 30, 2015.


RESOURCES & LINKS

DEBTFAIR Revealing the hidden debt structures in the art market.
JEWISH FREE LOAN ASSOCIATION Offers interest-free loans to students of all faiths in the Greater Los Angeles area.

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Feminist Labor Economists Deborah M. Figart, Ellen Mutari, and Catherine Mulder discuss the undervaluation of work in the arts and humanities, what you should know about changing the labor market, and its implications for artists and society.

About the speakers:
Dr. Deborah M. Figart is Professor of Education and Economics and Director of the Stockton Center for Economic and Financial Literacy, which serves as the southern regional office of the New Jersey Coalition for Financial Education. Dr. Figart received a Ph.D. in Economics from The American University in 1986 and a B.A. in Economics, summa cum laude, from Wheaton College in 1981. Dr. Figart is an internationally-known scholar in the field of labor and employment issues, and has written on the subjects of pay equity and labor discrimination, labor-management relations, working time, emotional labor at work, minimum and living wage issues, job evaluation, and career ladders. She will be the incoming President of the Association for Evolutionary Economics in 2016.

Professor Catherine Mulder, an assistant professor of economics at John Jay College of Criminal Justice-CUNY, specializes in labor economics and political economy. She has been a worker advocate and labor activist for over 30 years: from being an IBEW shop steward to Co-Speaker of her Graduate Student (employee) union, GEO-UAW, as a paid union representative in Manhattan for the American Federation of Musicians, Local 802, and most recently a member of PSC-CUNY, AFT Local 2334. Released in 2009 by Routledge Publishers, her book, Unions and Class Transformation: The Case of the Broadway Musicians details the role a union can take in usurping capitalism. Her most recent article, “Wal-Mart’s Role in Capitalism,” will appear in Rethinking Marxism.

Ellen Mutari is Professor of Economics at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey where she has taught since 1999. Mutari previously held visiting positions at the New School for Social Research, Rutgers University, and Monmouth University. She is the coauthor of the forthcoming Just One More Hand: Life in the Casino Economy, as well as other books and articles on contemporary employment issues, the history of labor market policies, and feminist political economy methodology. She was the Editor for the Routledge IAFFE Advances in Feminist Economics book series from 2008-2013, and is President Elect of the Association for Social Economics.

This program is the second in the series if it's not work it must be PLAY: discussions on the state of work in the arts. This series is presented by CUE, and produced by our inaugural Public Programming Fellow, Cevan Castle. For more information, visit cueartfoundation.org. The PLAY series is part of Meeting Artists' Needs.

Recorded live December 5, 2015.

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