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All My Relations Podcast

Matika Wilbur, Desi Small-Rodriguez & Adrienne Keene

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Welcome! All My Relations is a podcast hosted by Matika Wilbur (Swinomish and Tulalip), and Dr. Adrienne Keene (Cherokee Nation) to explore our relationships— relationships to land, to our creatural relatives, and to one another. Each episode invites guests to delve into a different topic facing Native American peoples today. We keep it real, play some games, laugh a lot, and even cry sometimes. We invite you to join us!
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This special three part series is a story about land, culture, and connections to place—it's the story to protect Mauna Kea on the Island of Hawaii. Kanaka Maoli people have been fighting to stop the construction of the thirty meter telescope (TMT) since it's inception in 2009, and in the summer of 2019 a resistance camp at Pu’u huluhulu was established on the Mauna.

Mauna Kea is the tallest mountain on earth from the sea floor to its summit. For Native Hawaiians, it is considered the most sacred, deeply honored in their creation story and time honored traditions. The destruction and ongoing desecration from tourism and the existing 13 telescopes on the Mauna has been devastating to the mountain’s fragile and unique ecosystem, and is a blatant disrespect to Kanaka cultural beliefs.

In this series we’ll listen to leaders in the movement to stop TMT and protect Mauna Kea, hear the history of the illegal overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom, about the sacredness of the land, the personal power of being in the movement, and bring us up to speed on what is happening now.

Central in the series are kapuna and scholar Dr. Auntie Noe Noe Wong-Wilson, scholar, poet, and activist; Jamaica Osorio, activist, educator, and cultural practitioner; and Lanakila Mangauil who discuss the health of the natural environment and its connection to fundamental rights as Indigenous peoples.

This first episode gives us the background and story of the beginning of the TMT fight and the cultural foundations of Mauna Kea.

“We take care of the land because without the land we have no culture. Our culture cannot exist without these places.” - Lanakila Mangauil

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Dr. Noe Noe Wong Wilson, Executive Director of The LĀLĀKEA FOUNDATION

Jamaica Osorio on Instagram

Lanakila Mangauil on Instagram
All My Relations on Instagram

Support

https://www.puuhuluhulu.com/

https://www.protectmaunakea.net/donate

Music and Ole’s

"E HŌ MAI"

https://www.puuhuluhulu.com/learn/protocol

“Kū Haʻaheo e Kuʻu Hawaiʻi”

Composed by Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu

from “Kūhaʻo Maunakea” (Kanaeokana)”

@kanaeokana

Interludes by

Masa Kobayashi

@thefunstreet

Episode artwork inspired by the four maidens, the goddesses of the snow-covered mountains, Poliʻahu, Waiau, Kahoupokane, and Lilinoe, drawn by Ciara Sana.
Special Thanks to Josh Mori for advising us on this episode.

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Love is something we all need, cherish, and desire in our lives. As Indigenous people we have always known that being in good relation with people, creatures, and the land is integral to wellbeing. Western science is just catching up to discover what we have known for time immemorial. Indeed, love and relationships are arguably the most important things in life. As settler colonial trauma and violence such as boarding schools have damaged our ability to love we know it is important to discuss how we can heal. We all have different forms of ceremony to find love within ourselves and there are so many ways to love. Thus, in this episode we ask how do we heal from historical trauma to love again?

We are so grateful to welcome an incredible First Nations scholar for this conversation.

Geraldine King (Anishinaabe) is a member of Kiashke Zaaging Anishinaabek located in the Robinson Superior Treaty area, northwestern Ontario.

Her research interests include: Anishinaabe erotics, ethics of intimacy, kinship studies, theories of Anishinaabe phenomenologies, eco-erotics and Indigenous pedagogical transformation.
Also joining us is Aunty Jillene Joseph (Gros Ventre) the Executive Director of the
Native Wellness Institute. She has traveled to hundreds of Native communities and interacted with and learned from thousands of people. Whether she is providing youth leadership training, assisting women heal from childhood trauma or helping to bring wellness to the workplace, Jillene shares her passion for being positive, productive and proactive.

Through reflection, stories, laughter, and personal perspective this episode delves into a great deal of what love looks like in Indigenous context. We should not have to talk about love in its proximity to whiteness, rather we hope to get a place where we can talk about love without violence. In spite of it all we are still here, still singing, still dancing. Call love into the world so you can feel and experience in it, that is ancestral love. You are not alone cause the earth is holding you, find love in all its forms. Good relationships founded in love keep us happier and healthier... period. So, let’s talk about how we get there.

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AMR on Instagram
Matika on Instagram and Twitter
Desi on Instagram and Twitter
Geraldine on Instagram and Twitter
Native Wellness Institute on Instagram
AMR Team
Creative direction, sound engineering, and editing: Teo Shantz

Film Editing: Jon Ayon

Sound production: Max Levin

Development Manager: Will Paisley
Production Assistant: Kristin Bolan

Director of Business Development: Edison Hunter

Social Media Intern: Lindsey Hightower

Research Intern: Keoni Rodriguez

2nd Editor: Carly Sjordal

Sales and Marketing Intern: Jamie Marquez-Bratcher

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Please join us for the third and final piece of our series on the movement to protect Mauna Kea. We have been incredibly humbled and blessed to have reported on the movement, and are so grateful to everyone who made this possible.

During the pandemic as tourist numbers have dropped, fish have returned in areas in Hawai’i where they have been absent for years. The land is healing itself. Despite the toll excessive tourism and capitalism has taken on the Hawaiian islands; there is still hope to heal. 27 years ago in 1993, tourists outnumbered Hawaiian residents 6:1 and Native Hawaiians 30:1. Imagine how those figures have risen today...

The Mauna Kea movement has been one of relationships: to land, water, air, kanaka (people), and spirit. On this episode we hear again from the incredible Jamaica Osorio, activist, educator, and cultural practitioner; and Dr. Auntie Noe Noe Wong-Wilson, scholar, poet, and activist. They discuss the lessons and revelations from time on the Mauna and pathways forward to honor relationships and empower future generations.

We recorded this episode the day after the violent insurrection on the Capitol, so we bring in our thoughts about resistance, activism, and overthrow under settler colonialism.

We hope that through this series you can join us in imagining an otherwise future, built and cemented in Indigenous relationships. There is so much to learn beyond this series, so please continue learning alongside us.

“We are certainly not too late to live in dignity with our āina” - Jamaica Osorio

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Follow

Dr. Noe Noe Wong Wilson, Executive Director of The LĀLĀKEA FOUNDATION

Jamaica Osorio on Instagram

All My Relations on Instagram

Support

https://www.puuhuluhulu.com/

https://www.protectmaunakea.net/donate

Music and Oli

Masa Kobayashi

Kanaeokana

La’ Howard

Episode art by Ciara Sana.

Fiscal Sponsorship by Speak Out!

Support the show (https://www.paypal.me/amrpodcast)

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This is part two in our series For the Love of the Mauna which shares the story of Native Hawaiians’ effort to protect Mauna Kea. The first episode gave us the background and story of the beginning of the TMT fight and the cultural foundations of Mauna Kea. This segment focuses on the resistance camp at Pu’u huluhulu which was established during the summer of 2019 on the Mauna. This ended up garnering attention because it was the largest mobilization of law enforcement in the history of Hawaii to fight those trying to stop the massive destructive construction project in the middle of conservation land. We highlight the kupuna line, the complex relationship with the police, the role of the University of Hawaii, and Native peoples’ relationship with science.

“The 30 meter telescope thought that they were going to erect a telescope, but really, they awoke a nation.” - Mehana Kihoi

Central in the series are kupuna and scholar Dr. Auntie Noe Noe Wong-Wilson, scholar, poet, and activist; Jamaica Osorio, activist, educator, and cultural practitioner; and Lanakila Mangauil who discuss the health of the natural environment and its connection to fundamental rights as Indigenous peoples.

+++

All My Relations is Listener Supported
Become a Patron

Follow

Dr. Noe Noe Wong Wilson, Executive Director of The LĀLĀKEA FOUNDATION

Jamaica Osorio on Instagram

Lanakila Mangauil on Instagram

All My Relations on Instagram

Support

https://www.puuhuluhulu.com/

https://www.protectmaunakea.net/donate

Episode artwork drawn by Ciara Sana.

Videography by Upthink Labs

Music by Masa Kobayashi
Fiscal Sponsorship by Speak Out!

Support the show (https://www.paypal.me/amrpodcast)

Support the show

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