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Dear Art Producer

Heather Elder

Dear Art Producer connects the photography and video community with art producers in the advertising community. This podcast introduces you to different art producers, share the stories of their diverse career paths, explore what it means to stay relevant and examine industry topics such as marketing, estimating, directing, websites and more.
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Dawn comes on the show today and dives into a multitude of subjects ranging from photography not being the only option anymore, to where she picks photographers from, to the paramount importance of relationships — she shares what you should never hesitate to do if you’re looking to get yourself out there.

Key Takeaways

[2:05] Heather introduces Dawn and invites her to talk about how she built her career at FCB Health, grew within the organization starting as a creative assistant straight out of college, and who some key people were in shaping the path that took her to where she is today.

[9:23] In an industry that has seen so much change, Dawn touches on the increased workload that is required of people in a day thanks to technology, but also on the incredible variety of artistic visions we get to see because of it!

[12:20] Dawn shares the crazy process of getting to the final three photographer choices starting with concepting — and the months and months of back and forth with the clients to hone in on what they need, even if that’s photography!

[14:35] Concepting is different in different formats whether it be animation, CGI, video or photography. Dawn talks about having clients testing multiple concepts at a time and having to manage all of those threads. Heather and Dawn discuss trends in format choices.

[17:50] No is the usual answer Dawn gives to any photographer asking if they could have “done anything differently” to get a job: it all comes down to creatives falling in love with an image, or the creative calls going one way rather than the other.

[20:41] On choosing photographers for bids — Workbook, AdEdge, and Agent and Rep websites are all places and tools Dawn draws inspiration for and uses to show her clients some options.

[24:06] Heather and Dawn discuss the paramount importance of people and relationships in this industry, and Dawn stresses how critical it is that she be able to say “Yes, I have met them” when she’s asked, “Do you know this photographer?”

[30:58] What makes a go-to person? Dawn lists the values and qualities that make those people shine.

[34:40] If you are a photographer and you are debating whether or not you should try to get that meeting. Don’t. Always try — even trying counts!

[37:45] Doing the right thing in business and being fair with people is the only way to do good business, and it goes a long way in the industry — everything comes back around.

[39:46] Dawn touches on what the estimating process is like for her — ballparks are tricky but they’re a start! — and how everything is geared at making sure everyone comes to a level playing field. She also talks about how she handles showing the estimates to the clients.

[47:02] Telling people they didn’t get the job, Dawn talks about why it’s so important to her.

[53:03] What would Dawn do if she wasn’t an art producer?

[53:39] Heather thanks Dawn for coming on the podcast, and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode.

Thanks for listening.

In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work.

Mentioned in this episode

FCB Health

BBDO

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Heather Elder’s Blog

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Dawn Kleidon on LinkedIn

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Kimber Leigh Nussbaum went from the theater to art production and grew up in the Golden Age of advertising. She shares her thoughts on the hustle of freelancing, social platforms, their usefulness and what photographers don’t know is shared about them behind the scenes.

Key Takeaways

[2:05] Heather introduces Kimber and invites her to share the path that took her from a theater actress and singer to being Dave Jordano’s studio manager to where she is today.

[6:12] Having “grown up” in the Golden Age of advertising photography, Kimber Leigh touches on the changes she has seen — starting with Dave Jordano’s beginnings with digital photography — and how digital has impacted workloads and schedules.

[8:10] Kimber touches on how the 2008 depression impacted the client/agency/photographer relationships — after having bent over backward and compromised to keep accounts with skeleton budgets and crews in a depressionary economy, clients got savvy and expected more for less.

[9:33] The best way Kimber has found to tackle tough client conversations is to set clear expectations and communication.

[12:42] What does a successful shoot look like? On time and under budget. Oh, and everyone getting along and having fun!

[13:23] Kimber and Heather touch on the importance of a rep’s role and the pros and cons inherent in trying a new photographer.

[17:04] Getting Kimber’s attention is independent of channels, it really is about the work, storylines, and images and how unique, new, cool or interesting they are. However, she advises to stay away from fold-outs: no one has an office anymore, go for small postcards if anything.

[19:20] Instagram isn’t a professional tool for her, but she does use online art producer Facebook communities. Heather and Kimber discuss the benefits of these groups as well as what photographers need to be mindful of in that regard.

[24:12] LinkedIn is a great professional tool, and it helps that it was never meant to be a personal place.

[26:00] Kimber walks us through the process of getting a job approved including the fact that every place and every job has a bit of a different process! The one thing she insists on is to try to remove the money hurdles and level the playing field so everyone can focus on the art.

[30:44] Once the job is awarded, Kimber will share who was bidding if you ask her. She and Heather discuss the impacts this information can have on photographers.

[36:20] Although Kimber does mostly print, she is interested in motion but being a freelancer, it’s a bit harder to get agencies to train you! It’ll be a future opportunity.

[37:41] Kimber shares her tips for being a successful freelancer and the hustle that it requires.

[39:51] What would Kimber do if she wasn’t an Art Producer, actress or singer!

[42:38] Heather thanks Kimber Leigh for coming on the podcast, and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode.

Thanks for listening.

In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work.

Mentioned in this episode

Dave Jordano

PhotoPolitic

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Heather Elder’s Bio

Heather Elder’s Blog

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Kimber Leigh Nussbaum’s LinkedIn

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[:31] Heather introduces Kathleen Candelaria and invites her to share the path that took her from studying accounting to realizing she needed an art outlet to where she is today.

[5:05] Kathleen talks about the key skills that some of her mentors taught her: keep a cool head, negotiate with your team, and people will ask for the impossible. When things get tense, Kathleen just puts all her chips in transparency

[7:20] Kathleen and Heather discuss how experience begets confidence and trust and how important these are in a changing industry.

[9:42] Social media was a huge game-changer for the industry and meant that everyone had to adjust quickly, Kathleen touches on how it has affected her teams and work and how she chose to work differently as she gained experience with new technologies.

[13:24] Getting Kathleen’s attention starts with the work itself, it has to speak to her, regardless of the medium you choose to communicate with her. Don’t gimmick it up, make it all about the work and if you can get a meeting with it, it’s a good bonus. She is also partial to handwritten and handmade things.

[17:02] Heather opens up the conversation on creative calls and treatments — since they are the perfect place for a photographer to showcase their brand — to get Kathleen’s perspective on these two very different but complementary steps in the selection process.

[21:54] Kathleen does use sourcebooks and saved emails but she’s not so much on social media.

[24:44] Kathleen explains what found footage is.

[26:42] Photographers that are repped have much more valuable resources at their fingertips. Reps provide a broader experience, more producers and in general — for difficult projects — a rep provides some peace of mind.

[27:37] Heather has photographer listeners that fall into two repping categories:

  1. I am up-and-coming but not repped.
  2. I am experienced and prefer bringing things in-house.

Kathleen shares important tips for photographers in these situations as well as her experience of both.

[33:17] Getting a job approved starts with getting the budget and checking if the client’s ask is reasonable within those parameters. If the budget is inadequate, Kathleen will share it with the photographers so that they can get creative with their bids.

[36:00] Kathleen picks up on another change she has seen in the industry and it’s about client education; she shares her experience in that respect.

[37:26] Heather asks Kathleen a few personal questions:

  • What she finds the most challenging in her job
  • What she loves about her job
  • Her favorite thing to do on a Sunday
  • What would she do if she wasn’t doing this!

[41:33] Heather thanks Kathleen for coming on the podcast, and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode.

Thanks for listening.

In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work.

Mentioned in this episode

AbelsonTaylor

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Heather Elder’s Bio

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Heather Elder on Instagram

Heather Elder on Twitter

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Heather Elder on Facebook

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Kathleen Candelaria on LinkedIn

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Today, Julie Maxham comes to the show and shares the incredibly varied experience she gathered at the side of some amazing mentors.

She and Heather talk about best practices and today’s episode is full, full, full of hands-on tips on what to do with your online presence, how to have the best website and the type of information to put out there.

Key Takeaways

[:31] Heather introduces Julie Maxham and invites her to share the path that took her from art school to saving Annie Leibovitz’s work from mini storage in New York, to where she is today.

[12:45] Julie has benefited from a long list of amazing mentors, she explains how she developed her own art producer style while rubbing shoulders with the industry’s greatest.

[14:32] Heather asks what Julie’s teams say about her!

[15:49] Having a rep to work with — and then a good producer — just guarantees someone has your back, Julie explains how you can both help each other make sure no balls are dropped.

[16:53] Julie shares what she feels have been the biggest changes in the art production world starting with mini in-house production companies with on-staff photographers, DPs, etc.

[21:20] Julie shares her tips for grabbing her attention: it starts with Instagram and it’s about showing who you are as a person. Heather and Julie dive into why it’s so very important today to showcase who you are and what makes you unique.

[25:10] Julie introduces Heather to the “Peanut Butter Photographer” to highlight how showcasing yourself can lead to work. She also shares her number one thing not to do with your books and promos if you don’t want to seem dated.

[28:00] Online sourcebooks are a resource Julie uses when she tackles locations where she doesn’t know many photographers — and her daughter makes a special appearance on the podcast!

[31:00] Getting a job approved with Julie starts with the question: ‘What’s the budget?’ because that number dictates where Julie will start looking for photographers.

[33:20] Heather and Julie discuss the different ways clients can fill their content bucket — new shoots, stock photo, royalty-free and rights-managed — they also talk about how these categories affect lifestyle photography.

[36:36] Heather shares her tips on working with cost consultants!

[39:59] Julie touches on having started to do more motion in the last year, mostly for Instagram — and if she doesn’t see motion on your site, she is moving on to the next one!

[41:48] Websites have to have categories that make sense; don’t make Julie fill out the little form to get in touch, have your information out there and have your name be clear on all your platforms! Heather and Julie list down all of the best practices on website organization and online presence.

[49:45] Heather thanks Julie for coming on the podcast, and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode.

Thanks for listening.

In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work.

Mentioned in this episode

Paul Strand Archives

Annie Leibovitz

LE BOOK

WorkBook

AtEdge

American Photography

PDN

Art Buyers Facebook page

More about your host

Heather Elder’s Bio

Heather Elder’s Blog

Heather Elder on Instagram

Heather Elder on Twitter

Heather Elder on LinkedIn

Heather Elder on Facebook

More about today’s guest

Julie Maxham on LinkedIn

Julie Maxham on Instagram

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Jodi Miller has been in the industry since she was 19 years old. This breadth of experience has been serving her with Pharmaceutical contracts and now she uses her skills to produce shopper marketing.

In this episode, she shares actionable tips for photographers without reps, what to do with SAG projects and what the most important thing she teaches to her mentees.

Key Takeaways

[:31] Heather introduces Jodi Miller and invites her to explain what shopper marketing is and to touch on what her career path has been like.

[3:15] Jodi and Heather exchange on the importance of mentoring in this field.

[5:25] Jodi shares what the biggest thing is that she tries to teach in this business — and why everyone needs to fail at it to understand truly.

[9:25] When it comes to change, the most obvious one to Jodi has been the reduction of budgets coupled with bigger asks in smaller time frames. She also touches on how to handle clients who have too small budgets and too little timing.

[14:52] Jodi’s a little bit old school when it comes to getting to know new people, so mailers still get her attention but she insists that the most important aspect is that the work be applicable to her projects.

[16:42] Setting up a new vendor is pretty standard in agency settings, Jodi breaks down the steps. She also opens up the conversation about how she talks to her clients about billing.

[20:55] Heather talks about the particular situation she finds herself in with regards to working in California.

[23:02] Jodi gives her take on the advantages of working with reps and some tips for photographers who don’t have one: serve yourself better!

[26:49] Motion demands are increasing and Jodi’s a huge fan, even though it’s a lot of work. She shares what the variables are for deciding who will be chosen to do a shoot that includes a motion aspect.

[30:16] If you have a SAG project, get an amazing paymaster! What is a paymaster exactly?

[32:14] Most of Jodi’s productions are video so her clients tend to know what they’re looking and she does let them choose their own producers.

[34:50] Heather asks Jodi to talk about what her experience as a woman in this business has been. Jodi also offers her perception of gender issues in the industry.

[40:17] Jodi asks to hear Heather’s perspective as a rep when it comes to female photographers’ positioning in the business.

[43:20] What would Jodi do if she wasn’t a producer?

[45:01] Heather thanks Jodi for coming on the podcast, and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode.

Thanks for listening.

In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work.

Mentioned in this episode

More about your host

Heather Elder’s Bio

Heather Elder’s Blog

Heather Elder on Instagram

Heather Elder on Twitter

Heather Elder on LinkedIn

Heather Elder on Facebook

More about today’s guest

Jodi Miller on LinkedIn

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Today’s episode marks a first in the coming expansion of the Dear Art Producer podcast’s format to include different roles in the creative process.

Jim Carlton joins the show to share his experience on a breadth of subjects from his perspective on the changes the industry has seen, to how to establish company culture, as well as some interesting tips and what he’s currently involved in.

Key Takeaways

[:31] Heather introduces Jim Carlton and shares how they met years ago.

[2:25] Jim is the perfect person to talk to about the creative process, but before diving into that, Heather asks where he finds his inspiration daily.

[7:09] What is the one thing Jim does that surprises people? He shares the story of one lunch he shared with colleagues who floored him with their own surprising secrets!

[10:29] Perseverance, self-knowledge, and fear of unhappiness drove Jim to forego one path and jump on the one that took him to his first job in advertising.

[17:21] Jim and Heather touch on the changes they’ve seen since they started. Jim talks for both the client and agency perspectives starting with the 3G acquisitions’ budget cuts, to digital and technology as well as a few more examples that underpin the blurring lines and roles in the creative industry.

[24:21] What are the main differences between boutique agencies and ones that are held by large companies? Jim shares his experience of both.

[28:54] Jim share what company culture means to him and how he managed to implement it at Geometry.

[33:24] What is Jim doing for Ariel Investments — who are looking for a refresh — and why!

[38:30] Heather asks Jim what the creative process looks like for a creative; he offers what he thinks may be the most useful for listeners to know.

[41:35] Getting Jim’s attention is in the details and it’s all about people. He shares an example about one particular photographer.

[44:57] Heather and Jim talk about the importance of relationships and the difference between IQ and EQ.

[48:33] Cooperation is critical to Jim for making the needle move, and why brainstorms are coming under fire.

[50:27] Heather puts some frequently asked listener questions to Jim: how do you stay relevant and how does someone grab Jim’s attention — he shares his advice for both and it starts with doing your homework.

[55:44] Heather thanks Jim for coming on the podcast, and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode.

Thanks for listening.

In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work.

Mentioned in this episode

Chicago

Crazy Rich Asians

Awkwafina

The Farewell

Contagious Magazine

Cannes Festival

FIT

PJ Clarke’s

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Heather Elder’s Bio

Heather Elder’s Blog

Heather Elder on Instagram

Heather Elder on Twitter

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Heather Elder on Facebook

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Jim Carlton on LinkedIn

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Shari Goetz comes on the podcast today to talk about what being a freelance Art Producer means in today’s advertising market and she shares important tips on how to be hired back by an agency.

Key Takeaways

[:31] Heather introduces Shari and asks her guest to talk about who she is, where she is from, how she found her way into art production, and how much technological evolution and industry changes have shaped the way we work and the kind of work she does today.

[6:13] Shari shares that the relationship with the client today is very different: there is a lot more client contact and they want a lot of assets and material for all sorts of usages with more and more limited budgets. So, an important part of her job today is communication to establish priorities.

[8:05] Heather and Shari touch on greay areas in terms of roles and responsibilities that were created by this new client proximity which the client accounts people used to take on.

[12:34] Heather emphasizes the importance of communication and prioritizing, especially when you have a client on siteon-site asking to add shots as you go! Shari shares some tips on how she handles these kinds of situations.

[16:52] The producer hired by the photographer should Iideally be Shari’s complement, but depending on the person this doesn’t necessarily happen,; it’s not always what she calls a “magical shoot.”.

[19:35] Shari walks us through the different ways the process can go from finding a photographer to getting a bid approved on her side.

[22:11] Grabbing her attention primarily goes through agents and reps, but she still does use sourcebooks. Photography is very emotional and subjective so it’s often about how the images make her feel.

[25:39] Heather and Shari share on what it means to be a professional photographer today, doing client service and managing teams... How many “B” people you can have without ruining your “A” team.

[27:40] Shari talks about the defining influence of broadcast on the escalation of photographers’ workload, notably treatments which she finds to be an enormous time expenditure.

[32:14] Shari will share who is bidding but it does make her uncomfortable sometimes: she tries to get all of the bids equal so that it’s only a creative call.

[34:45] Shari asks Heather a question about talent agencies which leads to a discussion on usage and NDA’s and union and labor laws.

[39:18] Is freelancing difficult? Shari touches on some of the challenges as well as the perks of freelancing.

[41:20] Shari shares a tip for photographers — meet everybody from the agency that you can and make sure you make magic shoots happen: they will want you back again.

[42:48] Heather thanks Shari for coming on the podcast, and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode.

Thanks for listening.

In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work.

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Heather Elder’s Bio

Heather Elder’s Blog

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Shari Goetz on LinkedIn

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Liz Miller Gershfeld brings 20 years of experience to the conversation; she started in journalism and caught the production bug. Today, she shares a treasure trove of tips and best practices.

Key Takeaways

[:31] Heather introduces Liz and asks her guest to talk about who she is, where she is from, how she found her way into art production, and what important skills are required for this line of work.

[7:36] Art production includes so much more production than it did at the time it was called art buying, Liz touches on the paramount importance of flexibility in an industry where change is the norm.

[9:25] There used to be a quantity minded media model that had a digital cadence — daily, weekly, or monthly social media updates for which content is required — but this is changing and some studies suggest that consumer attention is more focused on quality assets rather than quantity: we may see a return to the hero image! But all of this requires a lot of buyer education.

[13:12] Some clients think in terms of cost per asset or that the media use is a good valuation of the work being produced — if it lives in a social environment it should be less expensive. But ultimately, everyone is looking for ways to get more for less and “nimble” and “efficiency” are buzz words that have become almost weaponized, a good producer must find ways to be both.

[15:20] Because of client expectations and needs, the conversations that happen before and during bidding days are critical to the project running to everyone’s satisfaction: everyone needs to be detailed and specific and transparent.

[16:58] Liz will triple artist on the basis of the look and feel of their body of work as it relates to the project but her budgets are tight enough that she usually provides the ideal — though often unattainable — number they should all aim towards. She also looks for photographers that will offer solutions.

[20:20] Liz mentions that for her, knowing what is the client’s approach to the project can inform the whole process, is it budget, quality, or quantity?

[23:50] Treatments are necessary for jobs that have any measure of creative interpretation — product usage, e-commerce usually don’t. She does see treatments as both an opportunity and a protective measure in the sense that they serve as an additional explanation of how that production will go, reducing potential surprises.

[28:10] Heather asks what stands out in a treatment for Liz, and aside from articulating how the shoot will unfold, and who the critical resources are and why; she likes to see that there has been some kind of mental modeling around the project. She explains what accountability she expects from the treatments she receives.

[30:03] Heather brings up the importance of a photographer having a reflexion on the brand they are bidding and looking for some kind of alignment in their treatment, but also looking at themselves and how they are unique in the landscape in order to avoid sounding formatted — “insert photographer name here.”

[34:24] Grabbing Liz’s attention goes through meetings, and she’ll rarely say no to one — but follow up with reminders of who you are on a regular basis, continue building that relationship!

Pro tip — There are a lot of decisional people: don’t leave a meeting without getting another name and follow up on that person also.

[41:11] Heather thanks Liz for coming on the podcast, and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode.

Thanks for listening.

In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work.

Mentioned in this episode

BBDO

More about your host

Heather Elder’s Bio

Heather Elder’s Blog

Heather Elder on Instagram

Heather Elder on Twitter

Heather Elder on LinkedIn

Heather Elder on Facebook

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Liz Miller Gershveld on LinkedIn

Liz Miller Gershveld on Twitter

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Ilona started as a receptionist and worked her way up to art production — a position she has now worked in for 17 years. She shares quite a few practical tips and a lot of insights on her experience.

Key Takeaways

[:31] Heather introduces Elena and asks her guest to talk about who she is, where she is from, how she found her way into art production, and what important skills are required for this line of work.

[7:43] The biggest change Ilona has seen on the agency side of the industry is that the amount of work and assets that are produced has increased exponentially over the course of the last 10 years.

[9:37] Shooting print only simply does not exist anymore, and Ilona understands the client’s side of things in terms of getting more for your money and time — especially on shoots abroad — but it does require everyone to be a little more knowledgeable.

[11:08] Broadcast is separate in the way that they create the ad spots, but in terms of social media videos, that is more integrated into Ilona’s shoots.

[12:01] When it comes to print shoots with motion components, Ilona looks for photographers that can serve as a DP and work closely with a videographer.

[14:46] Heather and Ilona discuss the challenges of photographers having to work a video component, the real differences between the two media, and how it all plays out on a client account.

[16:44] Choosing a producer for a shoot is something Ilona has done before but it’s more important for the photographer to be comfortable working with a producer so she generally lets them pick.

[19:43] Getting Ilona’s attention can go through mailers and some website referral but mainly it’s about people doing their research before reaching out: look at what the producer is working on, how you can be relevant to their work.

[24:30] Ilona suggests that you put your name and your specialty in the subject line of the email, it’ll leave its mark!

[26:38] The hardest thing about bidding for Ilona is the ever-changing creative list, the client will add as they go without realizing that it may add a day. A lot of the time, there is a favorite before the bid starts, however it can be changed with a weak or strong creative call. Finally, always leave something for the cost consultant.

[29:52] Heather shares the “hairy arm” story — it also works well in a marriage!

[33:32] Sharing who is bidding against whom is something that Ilona will do, but it all depends on her relationship with the agent — her fear is that the artist would change their art to please, and lose their uniqueness. Heather shares her own view on the subject, providing Ilona with the agent perspective.

[38:46] What would Ilona do if she wasn’t an art producer?

[39:35] Heather thanks Ilona for coming on the podcast, and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode.

Thanks for listening.

In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work.

Mentioned in this episode

BBDO

PDN

More about your host

Heather Elder’s Bio

Heather Elder’s Blog

Heather Elder on Instagram

Heather Elder on Twitter

Heather Elder on LinkedIn

Heather Elder on Facebook

More about today’s guest

Ilona Siller on LinkedIn

Ilona Siller on Instagram

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Jamie Zimmermann is new to art producing; she joins the show to give a fresh perspective. Having been a rep, she shares how having seen both sides of the fence impacts how she tackles the job.

Key Takeaways

[:55] Heather introduces Jamie Zimmerman and asks her to share the path that took her from studying photography in college, production, and repping, to where she is today.

[4:45] Having been a rep, Jamie shares how she chooses to handle letting people know when they haven’t made the cut. Heather and Jamie also discuss what to do with large bid discrepancies.

[8:13] Jamie touches on the budget differences she sees working with younger photographers as well as how social shoots manage to work with scrappier budgets.

[11:44] Finding photographers for Jamie primarily goes through reps, because of the support system.

[12:29] What advice does Jamie have for unrepped photographers looking to get hired?

[14:27] Jamie will check a photographer’s Instagram to get a feel for their personality, but the creative calls are the biggest opportunity for photographers to shine: do make sure you talk!

[18:55] Treatments are one way for photographers to show images they might not otherwise have had the opportunity to share, but they should always keep the client in mind: their vision needs to be readable by non-creatives as well (read almost literal).

[23:06] Once the creative calls and treatments are in, Jamie finds that most of the time a clear front-runner will have appeared.

[25:46] On sharing who bid, Jamie and Heather share their points of view and some interesting personal experiences.

[32:35] Motion is an increasing ask — especially cinemagraphs — if motion doesn’t appear on a photographer’s website, she will move on to the next.

[36:24] What does her team say about her? Jamie’s answer leads to a discussion on building strong relationships, transparency, and trust.

[40:54] If not art production, what would Jamie do?

[41:30] Heather thanks Jamie for coming on the podcast, and invites listeners to tune in for the next episode.

Thanks for listening.

In an industry where the rules are always changing, it’s helpful to hear from those on the front line. Heather Elder is the visionary behind NotesFromARep’sJournal.com; visit her website for industry updates, stunning photography and video, and the artists behind the work.

Mentioned in this episode

FCB Chicago

Sandra Ann Sanchez

More about your host

Heather Elder’s Bio

Heather Elder’s Blog

Heather Elder on Instagram

Heather Elder on Twitter

Heather Elder on LinkedIn

Heather Elder on Facebook

More about today’s guest

Jamie Zimmermann on LinkedIn

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