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Cauldron - A Military History Podcast

Cullen Burke

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I'm Cullen Burke, and this is Cauldron - A Military History Podcast. I'll cover the significant battles in history, breaking down the vital players, weapons, methods, events, and outcomes. Let’s take a peek into the past and see what, if anything, can be learned from the most dramatic moments in our collective story. Let’s get stuck in!

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Battle of Schellenberg 2 July 1704

Cauldron - A Military History Podcast

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05/16/22 • 60 min

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"I had scarcely finished speaking when the enemy's battery opened fire upon us, and raked us through and through. They concentrated their fire upon us, and with their first discharge carried off Count de la Bastide, the lieutenant of my own company with whom at the moment I was speaking, and twelve grenadiers, who fell side by side in the ranks, so that my coat was covered with brains and blood. So accurate was the fire that each discharge of the cannon stretched some of my men on the ground. I suffered agonies at seeing these brave fellows perish without a chance of defending themselves, but it was absolutely necessary that they should not move from their post.” - Jean Martin de la Colonie

The battle of Schellenberg is one of the interesting stops on the Duke of Marlborough’s road to Blenheim. Time was in short supply and the Grand Alliance was in a tight spot, the heights over Donauworth had to be taken, and quickly. A frontal assault was in the offing and the deadly struggle that followed almost cost Marlborough his campaign, reputation, and maybe even the war itself. Let’s go back to the War of the Spanish Succession, the age of Marlborough and muskets. Let’s go back to 1704 and the battle of Schellenberg!

Music by DopeBoys

Sources Upon Request

Follow Along On Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and TikTok

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And Thanks For Listening!

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Battle of Rivoli Jan 14, 1797 – Jan 15, 1797

Cauldron - A Military History Podcast

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01/22/21 • 50 min

No general can say they will use the central position, and therefore, they will win. There is no plug and play preset list of maneuvers to fit all circumstances that guarantee victory. Victory relies on much more, and Napoleon understood that. His ability to sense the enemy's intention and force them to act against their own will is spooky at times. He had an intuitive feel for combat readiness, not just with the enemy but, maybe more importantly, in his ranks. His innate understanding of the weight and physics of battle, timing, and morale is hard to explain. The vision to see the picture, both strategic and tactical, and react with uncommon speed was unique for the time.

And beyond the general's tent and the map-room, Napoleon displayed what was probably his most remarkable traits as a leader. With a playwright's understanding of men's passions, he could give heart or strike fear with a few well-placed words. His glance, produced at the right moment to the right man, could expose a weakness or inspire courage. Like Hannibal and many others, he was a commander that lived and suffered very much with his men, at least at the beginning of his career. All these things mark Napoleon out as a uniquely gifted general. At the battle of Rivoli in mid-January 1796, we see them all come together at once, on full display for the first time in the "Little Corporal's" career.

  • 100 Decisive Battles: From Ancient Times to the Present by Paul K. Davis
  • The Allure of Battle: A History of How Wars Have Been Won and Lost by Cathal J. Nolan
  • Masters of the Battlefield: Great Commanders From the Classical Age to the Napoleonic Era by Paul K. Davis
  • Strategy by B. H. Liddell Hart
  • The Napoleonic Wars by Gunther E. Rothenberg
  • The Rise Of Napoleon Bonaparte by Robert B. Asprey
  • Fighting Techniques of the Napoleonic Age: Equipment, Combat Skills, and Tactics by Robert B Bruce
  • Wars of Napoleon. West Point Military History Series by Thomas (ed). Griess
  • A Military History and Atlas of the Napoleonic Wars by Brig. Gen. Vincent Esposito

Music - At Launch by Kevin McCloud

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09/25/20 • 35 min

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11/28/20 • 56 min

This was a lot of fun, and I hope pretty educational; I know I learned a ton. I reached out to Matt and asked him to join me for 20-30 minutes to talk about Vietnam's small arms. Instead, he gave me almost an hour of his time! Jammed with insight and information, the hour zipped right by. We covered the early development and reliability issues of the M16, its performance at Ia Drang, and briefly talked about some of the other weapons of the battle. We made sure to leave plenty of meat on the bone for conversations down the line! The Armourer's Bench is a great follow on all the platforms and if you can do so, support their Patreon page. https://armourersbench.com Support on Patreon - The Armourer's Bench Instagram and Facebook - @armourersbench Twitter - @historicfirearm https://www.historicalfirearms.info
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Battle of Ia Drang - Nov 14, 1965 – Nov 18, 1965

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11/20/20 • 60 min

"After the bravado, you're left with the anguish." Col. Nadal US 1st Battalion 7th Cavalry Regiment Air Mobile

Few battles have shaped the modern American mind while remaining mostly anonymous to the general public quite like Ia Drang. An iconic engagement that defined not just a war but a generation has gone, for the most part, forgotten. Maybe one of the most misunderstood battles in a misunderstood war, Ia Drang, had a considerable impact on modern American history. The action of Ia Drang Valley, fought from the 14th to the 17th in November 1965 remains, maybe the defining moment of the Vietnam War.

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11/07/20 • 65 min

The seeds of what would eventually become the Seven Years War or French and Indian War, a truly global conflict, were planted the moment Europeans landed in North America. Empire building was hungry work, and the British and French in the mid-18th century had become ravenous. In North America, the two empires frequently butted heads and regularly used Native tribes to stir up trouble or fight proxy wars. Initially, the French explored deeper into the heart of North America than the coast-bound English. So they staked a larger claim to the land, built far more numerous (and amicable) alliances with Native tribes, and most important of all, the French had chiseled together a lucrative, intricate trade network. The British daily had ships filled to the gunwales with people and goods landing up and down the easter seaboard and planned to smother the French through sheer weight of numbers. A fight over which national culture would dominate the New World was in the offing; all that was needed was a spark.

As the war progressed, events seemed to favor the French. Victory after victory fell the French way and the British were on their heels. The Siege of Fort William Henry and the massacre that followed appeared to be one more proverbial nail in the coffin. The short siege of the star fort on Lake George was small in terms of scale, but the aftereffects were massive. The propaganda coup that the massacre represented for the British was considerable. Never again would the Native American tribe's swarm to the French banners. The power of the colonial militias became abundantly apparent as they answered the call in the wake of the siege. Pitt's sea-change leadership in London went on to turn the war around in favor of the British, and soon the Seven Years War would be over. Of course, colonists would not remain content for long, war's are expensive, and the British Empire wanted the Americans to pay for their share.

Main Source - The Crucible of War by Fred Anderson

Music - Will be war soon_ by Kosa T

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01/15/21 • 85 min

I had a great conversation with Josh of the Adventure in Historyland blog and author of the book Wild East: The British in Japan 1854-1868. He knows his stuff, and his passion for history comes through loud and clear! We talked about all things Napoleon, the Italian Campaign, and Rivoli. Josh does a great job explaining interior lines and the central position doctrine as they relate to Rivoli. I had a lot of fun, and we will be sure to have him back for another battle; next time, I'll find a little Wellington engagement for him to chat about!

Check Josh out on Twitter and his blog link below, and let's support him independent historians need some love - buy his book! I have my copy coming and maybe we can get him back on to do a deep dive on it! Buy, follow, subscribe, rate, review!

Joshua Provan is a book reviewer, history writer and blogger, the founder of the award winning* Adventures in Historyland blog and contributes regularly to the Britannia Magazine on Facebook. His guest posts can also be found on several respected history blogs and websites. Although all of history fascinates him, he concentrates on British military history from the 17th to the mid-19th century. In addition, he has gained a reputation as a historical consultant and proofreader, an online historical content advisor and a research consultant.

https://adventuresinhistoryland.com/about/

https://twitter.com/LandOfHistory?s=20

https://read.amazon.com/kp/embed?asin=B0894XPQ29&preview=newtab&linkCode=kpe&ref_=cm_sw_r_kb_dp_a9gaGb319FB5X

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The Battle of Naseby - 14 June 1645

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08/26/20 • 57 min

The battle of Naseby decided the English Civil War in that by the day's end, King Charles I no longer had an effective field army. The two cavalry displays that define the fighting are a masterclass, one in battlefield control, and one in a lack of control. The brilliant command of Oliver Cromwell is on full display here while the Cavaliers show off their brash unruliness very...cavalierly! (I'm sorry it's the only bad joke I promise)

The aftermath of the battle in human costs was relatively small compared to the other actions we have covered, but the King's baggage train's seizure was catastrophic for Charles. Added with the loss of his army, events proved too great for Charles to overcome. His surrender and eventual execution dramatically changed the world political scene, and seeds were planted all over the world for the end of monarchy. Enjoy!

Main source - Naseby 1645 by Martin Marx Evans

Artwork - King Charles I and Prince Rupert before the Battle of Naseby 14th June 1645 during the English Civil War - unknown author

Music - Americana Aspiring - Kevin McLeod

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07/06/20 • 108 min

In this episode, we are diving into one of the more controversial and least covered battles of WWII - the fight for Monte Cassino. A sideshow to the main events of Normandy and the Eastern Front, the Italian Campaign was no less violent or brutal, consuming men and material at the same rate as the worst fighting in either World War. The ancient monastery of the Benedictine Order loomed over the entire battlefield like some Tolkein-Esque evil tower. Time and again, the Allied soldiers mentioned the ever-present feeling of being watched by Monte Cassino, and its eventual destruction was likely inevitable. But the bombing of such a culturally relevant sight has become the lasting legacy of the battle - is "military necessity," as Eisenhower phrased it, always the right path? Are there any structures of historical significance that should be outside the realm of warfare? In the case of Monte Cassino, both Allied intelligence at the time of the fighting and inquiries after the war found no German occupation of the monastery. And unfortunately for the Gurkha, Indian, New Zealand, and eventually the Poles that had to try and take the rubble that was Monte Cassino, the bombing had made the Axis position ten-fold more challenging to assault. By battles end, the Axis forces along the Gustav Line had been dislodged and sent reeling north. Rome was taken soon after, and the overwhelming might and logistical superiority of the democracies were brought to bear on the Wehrmacht for the first time in Europe proper.

So this time on Cauldron, let's go back to the frigid rain and icy peaks of the Southern Apennine Mountains. The late winter in the Liri Valley, waterlogged and deadly, bristling with the guns and traps of a dug in and ready Wehrmacht. To 1944, a time when the Grand Alliance was shaky at best, Stalin demanding the Western powers spill blood so his armies could catch their breath. To a time when the Americans were still trying to figure out how best to use their incredible strength and regularly failing. To a time when the British relied on their colonial forces for much of the heavy-lifting, and those colonial fighters never failed. To a place where 100's of years of art, culture, and religious thought resided in one of the world's most elegant and beautiful monasteries. Perched over the land like humanity had placed all his finest things on a grand pedestal in the hopes it would remain unharmed forever; the monastery was doomed from the battles beginning. Let's go back to what historian Matthew Parker has called "The Hardest-Fought Battle of World War II." Let's go back to January to May 1944, and the battle of Monte Cassino.

Checkout the interview I did with author/historian Matthew Parker here - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/interview-matthew-parker-author-monte-cassino-hardest/id1345505888?i=1000480879271

Also for some fantastic photos and maps go to here - https://www.matthewparker.co.uk/About_the_author.php

To buy a copy of Parker's excellent book Monte Cassino - The Hardest-Fought Battle of World War II go here - https://www.matthewparker.co.uk/buyonlineoptions.php

Main source - Monte Cassino - The Hardest-Fought Battle of World War II by Matthew Parker

Artwork - terrybogard392 @ Fiverr

Music - The Future Ancient Now - Nathan Moore

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Kokoda: Beyond the Legend with Dr. Karl James

Cauldron - A Military History Podcast

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02/12/21 • 65 min

In this episode, I talked to Dr. Karl James, the head of military history at the Australian War Memorial. The book he edited, Kokoda: Beyond the Legend, was the principal source for this series, and let me tell you, it's a fantastic read! Various contributors, including Antony Beevor, weave together the story of Kokoda, both past and present. A truly comprehensive account of the battle for the Owen Stanley mountains, Kokoda: Beyond the Legend, also contextualizes the campaign within the wider war. Like any fair bit of history, the book tells the story of struggle and endurance, suffering and success, from every angle; Allied, Japanese, and Native giving each their proper due. Dr. James was a blast to chat with, funny, engaged, and a man that knows his stuff; he was kind enough to give me a full hour of his Sunday morning. Give a listen, rate review, subscribe, and click the link in the show notes to pick up a copy of Kokoda: Beyond the Legend!

Guest - Dr Karl James is a Senior Historian in the Military History Section of the Australian War Memorial, where he has worked since 2006, and Departmental Visitor with the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at the Australian National University. A graduate of the University of Wollongong, he specializes in Australia’s involvement in the Second World War, and the history of Australia’s Special Operations Forces.

Find him on Twitter @KarlJames_1945

And grab a copy of Kokoda: Beyond the Legend @ https://read.amazon.com/kp/embed?asin=B06XB1J7CG&preview=newtab&linkCode=kpe&ref_=cm_sw_r_kb_dp_7028W0ETR0NJ49SSYX2R&tag=cauldronpodca-20

Sources

  • Kokoda: Beyond the Legend edited by Dr. Karl James
  • Kokoda by Peter Fitzsimons
  • The Pacific War by William B.Hopkins
  • Battlegrounds by M. Stephenson
  • The West Point Atlas Of War - World War II: The Pacific edited by Brigadier General V. J. Esposito

Music - Cinematic Trailer by Scott Holmes Music

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FAQ

How many episodes does Cauldron - A Military History Podcast have?

Cauldron - A Military History Podcast currently has 79 episodes available.

What topics does Cauldron - A Military History Podcast cover?

The podcast is about Military History, History and Military.

What is the most popular episode on Cauldron - A Military History Podcast?

The episode title 'Battle of Schellenberg 2 July 1704' is the most popular with 2 listens, 1 ratings and 1 comments/reviews.

What is the average episode length on Cauldron - A Military History Podcast?

The average episode length on Cauldron - A Military History Podcast is 46 minutes.

How often are episodes of Cauldron - A Military History Podcast released?

Episodes of Cauldron - A Military History Podcast are typically released every 17 days, 19 hours.

When was the first episode of Cauldron - A Military History Podcast?

The first episode of Cauldron - A Military History Podcast was released on Jan 9, 2018.

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