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Seedcast

Nia Tero

Seedcast is a story centered podcast, produced by Nia Tero, where we dig up, nurture, and root stories of the Indigenous experience from around the world.
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Indigenous leaders at the forefront of the fight against climate change were at the COP27 climate talks in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt this month and Nia Tero showed up in solidarity. Break through the noise and the corporate greenwashing, and listen with us to Indigenous policy advocates, activists, storytellers and artists who made the trip to Egypt, often at risk to themselves -- because everything is at stake in this moment, and we need the collective power of all peoples to meet it.

Featured voices include:

This episode features the music of Eric Terena, a Brazilian D-J, journalist and activist who belongs to the Terena people and is a founding member of Mídia Índia.

Producers: Felipe Contreras, Stina Hamlin, and Jenny Asarnow. Story editors: Jessica Ramirez and Tracy Rector. Host: Jessica Ramirez. Special thanks to Shar Tuiasoa, Jacob Bearchum, Michael Painter and Valeree Velasco for help with this episode.

We want to hear your stories, too. What is at stake for YOU and YOUR communities in this moment of climate crisis, and what are you doing to fight for our future? Let us know by sending us an email at: seedcast@niatero.org

Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.

Enjoy the Seedcast podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and your other favorite podcast platforms.
Keep up with Seedcast on social media: follow @NiaTero and use the hashtag #Seedcast.

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It’s time for a new Seedcast Spotlight episode. This time we’re sharing an episode from the podcast On Being with Krista Tippett featuring mother, scientist, and professor Robin Wall Kimmerer, an enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation.

"In Indigenous ways of knowing, we say that we know a thing when we know it not only with our physical senses, with our intellect, but also when we engage our intuitive ways of knowing — of emotional knowledge and spiritual knowledge,” says Robin Wall Kimmerer in this episode. “Traditional knowledge engages us in listening.”

Robin was just named a 2022 MacArthur Fellow. Her books Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants and Gathering Moss: A Natural and Cultural History of Mosses interweave traditional knowledge and scientific knowledge, showing the gifts that each has to offer.

In this episode, she shares stories of her personal relationship to the worlds of plants, how they teach us to live within our means and how we can apply those lessons to everyday life.

We'd like to thank On Being host Krista Tippett, senior producer Julie Siple, and On Being Project Vice President of Operations and Vitality Colleen Scheck for their generosity in entering into this collaboration with us.

Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.

Enjoy the Seedcast podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and your other favorite podcast platforms.
Keep up with Seedcast on social media: follow @NiaTero and use the hashtag #Seedcast.

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Seedcast is headed to Egypt! Seedcast Producer Felipe Contreras and Executive Producer Tracy Rector share notes from the road (or, rather, the sky) on their way to COP27, the U.N. global climate talks happening in Sharm el-Sheikh. No Blue Zone or Green Zone passes here, but Felipe and Tracy will be showing up in solidarity with Indigenous leaders from around the world and hearing stories from the front lines of climate change. Indigenous land defenders and storytellers don’t make headlines enough at events like COP27 or the upcoming U.N. biodiversity talks in Montreal, unfortunately, but they are exactly the people who hold the knowledge we need to heal the world and the stories we center on Seedcast. Stay tuned for a whole episode filled with their stories later in November and more coverage in the coming months.

We want to hear your stories, too. What is at stake for YOU and YOUR communities in this moment of climate crisis, and what are you doing to fight for our future? Let us know by sending us an email at: seedcast@niatero.org

Listen to stories that came out of our conversations with female Indigenous leaders at COP26 in 2021:

Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.

Enjoy the Seedcast podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and your other favorite podcast platforms.
Keep up with Seedcast on social media: follow @NiaTero and use the hashtag #Seedcast.

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"If climate change is the fight of our lives, we cannot win that fight by way of facts.” Julian Aguon is a CHamoru Indigenous human right lawyer from Guam and author of the essay “To Hell with Drowning,” which was published in The Atlantic and nominated for a Pulitzer Award in 2021. Alice Walker said this of Julian’s soon-to-be-released memoir-manifesto, No Country for Eight-Spot Butterflies: “Its fierce love—of the land, the ocean, the elders, and the ancestors—warms the heart and moves the spirit.” Julian talked with Seedcast producer Felipe Contreras about the importance of storytelling in activism, the longstanding effects of colonialism, and why it’s essential for Islanders to add their unique voices to the fight against climate change. Also included is Felipe Contreras’ reflections on his own Puerto Rican heritage in the wake of the most recent hurricane, a shout out to Bad Bunny, and a preview of what kinds of conversations could be in store at November’s U.N. global gathering in Egypt, COP27.

Producer and Host: Felipe Contreras. Story Editor: Jenny Asarnow

Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.

Enjoy the Seedcast podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and your other favorite podcast platforms.
Keep up with Seedcast on social media: follow @NiaTero and use the hashtag #Seedcast.

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When was the first time you saw yourself represented on a big or small screen? Hollywood representations of Indigenous peoples have been rare and often harmful, and that’s why Indigenous filmmakers are working to dismantle decades upon decades of negative stereotypes. In this episode, hear how Indigenous narrative sovereignty – telling our own stories – is connected to Indigenous land sovereignty – having a say in how the lands we are connected to are cared for. Also, find out how imagineNATIVE is supporting Indigenous filmmakers, improving representation on-screen and off, and honoring sacred duties to land. We talk with Cynthia Lickers-Sage (Mohawk Nation) about founding imagineNATIVE over 20 years ago, Naomi Johnson (Mohawk Nation) and Jamie-Lee Reardon (Ojibwe/Irish) about the work they do today, Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers (Kainai First Nation / Sámi) about what it’s like to be a filmmaker supported by the organization, and Melanie Hadley (Pine Creek First Nation) about how she uplifts Indigenous creators in her role as a studio executive.

Producer: Julie Keck. Story Editor: Stina Hamlin. Host: Jessica Ramirez.

Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.

Enjoy the Seedcast podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and your other favorite podcast platforms.
Keep up with Seedcast on social media: follow @NiaTero and use the hashtag #Seedcast.

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At the start of each year, the Gabbra people of eastern Africa come together to celebrate. They spend much of the year traveling long distances, managing large herds of grazing animals across vast stretches of grasslands and deserts. In this episode, hear their songs of celebration and how they stay in close and constant dialogue with each other, exchanging knowledge they glean from the sun, moon, stars, clouds, slaughtered animals, the long memories of elders, and more, as they work to pass on their traditions and revitalize their knowledge.

This is the second episode in our two-part Gabbra series, which is a special collaboration with the Gabbra community, a member of the Wayfinders Circle. You can hear the first part of this series here.
We extend gratitude to Ali Mero and Gabbra elder Molu Kulu Galgalo, who were our collaborators for this series.

We also thank the Wayfinders Circle for their support on these episodes.
The Wayfinders Circle was launched as a network dedicated to unleashing the transformative potential of Indigenous lifeways, inspiring all people to reimagine development, conservation, and the way they relate to each other and to Mother Earth. The conveners of the Wayfinders Circle are the Pawanka Fund, the World Union of Indigenous Spiritual Practitioners, and Nia Tero.
Host: Jessica Ramirez. Producer: Jenny Asarnow. Story Consultant: Kamna Shastri.

Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.

Enjoy the Seedcast podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and your other favorite podcast platforms.
Keep up with Seedcast on social media: follow @NiaTero and use the hashtag #Seedcast.

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One hundred years ago, Gabbra elders in the dry lands of eastern Africa told their nomadic people that a big change was coming. To get through it, they would need to hold their traditions close. In this episode of Seedcast - the first of two parts – hear from a Gabbra senior elder as he shares a story with a member of his community. He speaks about how Gabbra traditional knowledge has allowed their ecosystem to support human, animal, and plant life through generations, while also helping them navigate colonization and climate crisis.

For this special Seedcast collaboration, the Gabbra community, a member of the Wayfinders Circle, shared recordings of their songs and celebrations along with the lands and animals they shepherd. We also thank Ali Mero and Gabbra elder Molu Kulu Galgalo, who were our collaborators for this series.

We thank the Wayfinders Circle for their support on these episodes. The Wayfinders Circle was launched as a network dedicated to unleashing the transformative potential of Indigenous lifeways, inspiring all people to reimagine development, conservation, and the way they relate to each other and to Mother Earth. The conveners of the Wayfinders Circle are the Pawanka Fund, the World Union of Indigenous Spiritual Practitioners, and Nia Tero.
Host: Jessica Ramirez. Producer: Jenny Asarnow. Story Consultant: Kamna Shastri.

Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.

Enjoy the Seedcast podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and your other favorite podcast platforms.
Keep up with Seedcast on social media: follow @NiaTero and use the hashtag #Seedcast.

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“If you know where you’re coming from, you know where you’re going, and you cannot get lost.”

At a tea house on the side of the road, on the way to Marsabit, Kenya, a Gabbra senior elder sat down with a member of his community to tell a story about how colonization has affected the rhythms of their peoples’ nomadic ways of life in the grasslands and deserts of eastern Africa, and how traditional knowledge has gotten them through. Drawing from interpretations of the moon, the sun, the stars, the birds, and the entrails of slaughtered animals, the Gabbra’s knowledge can be applied in the world we live in today. This is an invitation to be in dialogue.
Enjoy this sneak peek of our special two-part episode, and subscribe to Seedcast today so you can be the first to listen to both episodes when they come out.
For this special collaboration, the Gabbra community shared recordings of their songs and celebrations along with the lands and animals they shepherd. The Gabbra is a member of the Wayfinders Circle.
We extend gratitude to Ali Mero and Gabbra elder Molu Kulu Galgalo, who were our collaborators for this series.
We also thank the Wayfinders Circle for their support on these episodes.
The Wayfinders Circle was launched as a network dedicated to unleashing the transformative potential of Indigenous lifeways, inspiring all people to reimagine development, conservation, and the way they relate to each other and to Mother Earth. The conveners of the Wayfinders Circle are the Pawanka Fund, the World Union of Indigenous Spiritual Practitioners, and Nia Tero.
Host: Jessica Ramirez. Producer: Jenny Asarnow. Story Consultant: Kamna Shastri.

Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.

Enjoy the Seedcast podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and your other favorite podcast platforms.
Keep up with Seedcast on social media: follow @NiaTero and use the hashtag #Seedcast.

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“When I'm making pots, I'm thinking all the way back to creation.” - Katsitionni Fox

Welcome to this final episode of Seedcast’s second season, a story full of heart and warmth about the power of intention. Katsitsionni Fox (Haudenosaunee artist, Bear Clan) takes us inside her studio and shares how making clay pots connects her to her ancestors, the women who made pots for daily use in Akwesasne, a Mohawk Territory in upstate New York.

The practice of making these pots was lost for generations and the clay earth itself was contaminated, but now Katsitsionni and others are revitalizing this traditional craft with great care, sharing teachings across tribes, nations and generations. Making “grandmother clay pots,” Katsitsionni incorporates her cultural practice of gratitude while cultivating the curiosity of a new generation of potters. She has built deep relationships with the clay and shares her teachings with us: “If everybody was having that intention every day to be grateful and thankful and to acknowledge all of our relatives, this world would be a different place.”

See Katsitsionni Fox’s pottery on her Instagram.

Katsitsionni is also an award-winning director and is creating a film for the second season of Reciprocity Project, a collaboration between Nia Tero and Upstander Project.

Host: Jessica Ramirez. Producer: Taylor Hensel. Story Editor: Jenny Asarnow

Seedcast is a production of Nia Tero, a global nonprofit which supports Indigenous land guardianship around the world through policy, partnership, and storytelling initiatives.

Enjoy the Seedcast podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and your other favorite podcast platforms.
Keep up with Seedcast on social media: follow @NiaTero and use the hashtag #Seedcast.

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