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Breaking History Podcast

Breaking History Committee

A world history podcast run by Graduate Students at the History Department at Northeastern University, in Boston, USA.
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Join Jamie Parker, Matt Bowser, and James Robinson as we discuss Jack Gronau's dissertation, "French Women, But Not Citizens: Colonial Emigration, Imperial Prostitution, and the Emancipatory Writings of French Feminists, 1897-1962" with Jack himself. Jack tells us about how he came to focus on French North Africa and French Feminist imperialist history, from German history to Jewish history to WWII. His dissertation is framed as a series of episodes, and how French feminists engaged with the Empire and how they navigated the French imperial project. Jack details how he found voices invisible in history, by looking into French women's emigration societies' papers, the Feminist Press in Algeria, and how masculinity/femininity played out in colonial Algeria. French women would enforce racial norms and help normalize men in settler-colonies, Gronau argues. The "Civilizing Mission" was, in the end, a way for French women to claim their part in the Empire. Last, Gronau looks to the campaign against prostitution as a way to bolster their emancipatory claims. Books mentions in the podcast: "Burdens of History: British Feminists, Indian Women, and Imperial Culture, 1865-1915" by Antoinette Burton https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/295901.Burdens_of_History "French Women and the Empire: The Case of Indochina" by Marie-Paule Ha https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/18951025-french-women-and-the-empire "Colonial Metropolis: The Urban Grounds of Anti-Imperialism and Feminism in Interwar Paris" by Jennifer Anne Boittin https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8577409-colonial-metropolis "Transnational France: The Modern History of a Universal Nation" by Tyler Stovall https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22668823-transnational-france The Breaking History podcast is a production of the Northeastern University History Graduate Student Association. Producers and Sound Editors: Matt Bowser, Cassie Cloutier, and Dan Squizzero Theme Music: Kieran Legg Today's hosts were: Matt Bowser, Jamie Parker, and James Robinson. twitter: @BreakingHistPod
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Please join Bridget, Debra, James, Jamie, and Matt to talk about the MMIW (Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in the US and Canada) movement. Debra leads us through the discussion on this long standing emergency situation in both the United States and Canada. We talk about the history of the movement and how its played out differently in Canada and the United States. How does this fit into the larger history of violence against Indigenous women and how the movement is fighting back. We talk about a few different cases and how the history of "Indian Affairs" agencies has played out. What's the weakness of the Truth and Reconciliation Commissions? Full disclosure: None of the speakers are indigenous people and we acknowledge that. Further Reading on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls in the US and Canada: The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) https://www.nwac.ca/ Coalition to Stop Violence Against Native Women https://www.csvanw.org/mmiw/ National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls http://www.mmiwg-ffada.ca Walking With Our Sisters http://walkingwithoursisters.ca Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Report-Urban Indian Health Institute http://www.uihi.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/Missing-and-Murdered-Indigenous-Women- and-Girls-Report.pdf Sovereign Bodies Institute-MMIW Database https://www.sovereign-bodies.org S. 1942 Savanna’s Act 115 th Congress https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/1942/text Kim Anderson, Maria Campbell, Christi Belcourt, eds. Keetsahnak: Our Missing and Murdered Indigenous Sisters Sarah Deer, The Beginning and End of Rape: Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America Andrea Smith, Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide Jane M Smith, Richard M Thompson II, CRS Report for Congress. Tribal Criminal Jurisdiction over Non-Indians in the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) Reauthorization and the SAVE Women Act. April 18, 2012. Emmanuelle Walter, Stolen Sisters: The Story of Two Missing Girls, Their Families, and How Canada has Failed Indigenous Women The Breaking History podcast is a production of the Northeastern University History Graduate Student Association. Producers and Sound Editors: Matt Bowser, Cassie Cloutier, and Dan Squizzero Theme Music: Kieran Legg Today's hosts were: Matt Bowser, Bridget Keown, Debra Lavelle, Jamie Parker, and James Robinson. twitter: @BreakingHistPod
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Please join Bridget, James, Matt, Simon, Thanasis, and Will as we discuss the global history of right-wing populism. What is populism? What is the history of nativist populism? How has it played out across the globe? Where we can trace direct intellectual traditions versus general impulses? Why has it been so effective an organizing force in modern history? How has gender played out in right-wing populism? Is it inherently masculine? Is right-wing populism inevitably if we look historically, to our present day? Where is the crossover between right-wing and left-wing populism? How do conspiracy theories play in populism? How do these ideas spread? Books Mentioned in the Podcast: Rural Radicals: Righteous Rage In The American Grain by Catherine McNicol Stock https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1214303.Rural_Radicals Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism by Benedict Anderson https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/399136.Imagined_Communities The Populist Vision by Charles Postel https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1599876.The_Populist_Vision From Fascism to Populism in History by Federico Finchelstein https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/34408690-from-fascism-to-populism-in-history The Rise of Duterte: A Populist Revolt Against Elite Democracy by Richard Javad Heydarian https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/35548361-the-rise-of-duterte Roots of Reform: Farmers, Workers, and the American State, 1877-1917 by Elizabeth Sanders https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/335652.Roots_of_Reform The Age of Reform by Richard Hofstadter https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/770032.The_Age_of_Reform Weimar Radicals: Nazis and Communists Between Authenticity and Performance by Timothy S. Brown https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/5138638-weimar-radicals Sexuality and German Fascism by Dagmar Herzog https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/349800.Sexuality_and_German_Fascism Mothers of Massive Resistance: White Women and the Politics of White Supremacy by Elizabeth Gillespie McRae https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/35013165-mothers-of-massive-resistance The Breaking History podcast is a production of the Northeastern University History Graduate Student Association. Producers and Sound Editors: Matt Bowser, Cassie Cloutier, and Dan Squizzero Theme Music: Kieran Legg Today's hosts were: Matt Bowser, Bridget Keown, Thanasis Kinias, Simon Purdue, James Robinson, Will Whitworth twitter: @BreakingHistPod
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Please join Bridget, James, Matt, and Thanasis as we talk about settler-colonialism in world history! What is settler-colonialism? What are settler-colonies and how did they develop differently? Replacing indigenous populations or ruling over those populations? Who belongs and who is erased in the public perception of the nation? We discuss the "blank space" presented by settlers to push indigenous people out and the differing intentions of settler-colonies. We talk about how hyper-masculinity explicitly defines political systems of settler-colonialism. Did settler-colonialism produce whiteness or was it something different? How does settler-colonialism fit into the larger imperial project? What does it mean to live in a settler-colonial society today? Books mentioned in the episode: Islands of White: Settler Society and Culture in Kenya and Southern Rhodesia, 1890-1939 by Dane Kennedy https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1129042.Islands_of_White Drawing the Global Colour Line: White Men's Countries and the International Challenge of Racial Equality by Marilyn Lake, Henry Reynolds https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2551707.Drawing_the_Global_Colour_Line Settler Colonialism: A Theoretical Overview by Lorenzo Veracini https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11318355-settler-colonialism Settler Colonialism and the Transformation of Anthropology: The Politics and Poetics of an Ethnographic Event by Patrick Wolfe https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1238448.Settler_Colonialism_and_the_Transformation_of_Anthropology Traces of History: Elementary Structures of Race by Patrick Wolfe https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23602714-traces-of-history The Breaking History podcast is a production of the Northeastern University History Graduate Student Association. Producers and Sound Editors: Matt Bowser, Cassie Cloutier, and Dan Squizzero Theme Music: Kieran Legg Today's hosts were: Matt Bowser, Bridget Keown, Thanasis Kinias, Jamie Parker, James Robinson
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Join Bridget, Dan, James, Jamie, Matt, and Thanasis as we discuss the legacies of World War One, as the centenary of the First World War's end of the war armistice is marked on the publishing day of this episode. We discuss issues of public memories of masculinity, propaganda, world vs the European war, how the war is remembered differently in different places. We look to how the war was used by political movements to shift memories for their own purposes, such as the "stabbed in the back" myth by the Nazis, and how shame was used to frame the war. We discuss the possibilities after the war that quickly go awry, especially in how the Ottoman Empire is carved up and the limits of "making the world safe for democracy" when dealing with colonial empires. Who gets included in citizenship after the war and who doesn't? How do the empires of Europe begin to crumble in the ashes of war, as subject people take the opportunity to push back? How should Armistice Day be remembered? We remember the veterans but what about the mutinies that end the war? We discuss how narrow the definition of veteran has been, and how gender lines are drawn. We do some comparisons of Armistice Day vs Veterans Day in the UK vs US. We talk about the poppy, and the consequences of war globally! Picture: 369th Infantry (Colored): the "Harlem Hellfighters", who fought under French command because General Pershing refused to have them in the American forces. Books mentioned that the listener may want to pick up in order to know all the good points we brought up: The Wilsonian Moment: Self Determination and the International Origins of Anticolonial Nationalism by Erez Manela https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1537700.The_Wilsonian_Moment A Peace to End All Peace: The Fall Of The Ottoman Empire And The Creation Of The Modern Middle East by David Fromkin https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/78107.A_Peace_to_End_All_Peace The Breaking History podcast is a production of the Northeastern University History Graduate Student Association. Producers and Sound Editors: Matt Bowser, Cassie Cloutier, and Dan Squizzero Theme Music: Kieran Legg Today's hosts were: Matt Bowser, Bridget Keown, Thanasis Kinias, Jamie Parker, James Robinson, Dan Squizzero
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Join us as we talk about the legacies of Cold War history on our present world. We chat about what is happening both between the Capitalist West and Communist Bloc, and the anti-colonial to postcolonial global struggles. We talk power, gender structures and identities, economics, ideas of left vs right, nationalism, the Non-Aligned Movement, shifting alliances, and the propagandistic triumph of neoliberal capitalism coupled bound by right-wing nationalism. We look to the rise of the hard-right in the wake of the Cold War. Is there books to read to know more? That's a really good point, listener. Yes, they are! The UAW and the Heyday of American Liberalism, 1945 1968 by Kevin G. Boyle https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/709532.The_UAW_and_the_Heyday_of_American_Liberalism_1945_1968 Marxism in the United States: Remapping the History of the American Left by Paul M. Buhle https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1749496.Marxism_in_the_United_States Modernization as Ideology: American Social Science and "Nation Building" in the Kennedy Era by Michael E. Latham https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1075782.Modernization_as_Ideology The Global Cold War: Third World Interventions and the Making of Our Times by Odd Arne Westad https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/156594.The_Global_Cold_War The Lavender Scare: The Cold War Persecution of Gays and Lesbians in the Federal Government by David K. Johnson https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/206541.The_Lavender_Scare Tales of the Lavender Menace: A Memoir of Liberation by Karla Jay https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/534736.Tales_of_the_Lavender_Menace Patterns of Empire: The British and American Empires, 1688 to the Present by Julian Go https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/12896981-patterns-of-empire The Breaking History podcast is a production of the Northeastern University History Graduate Student Association. Producers and Sound Editors: Matt Bowser, Cassie Cloutier, and Dan Squizzero Theme Music: Kieran Legg Today's hosts were: Matt Bowser, Cassie Clouter, Bridget Keown, Jamie Parker, Simon Perdue, James Robinson, and Will Whitworth
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Join as we talk to English PhD Candidate Liz Polcha, who specializes in 18th and 19th century American and Caribbean literature, about her dissertation, "Redacting Desire: The Sexual Politics of Colonial Science in the Eighteenth-Century Atlantic World". Liz talks about her research path, navigating the worlds of literary criticism and history, feminist and postcolonial digital scholarship, and her dissertation. Very creepy diaries and travel narratives of the slave world of the early Caribbean! She walks us through some of her subjects, who fancied themselves as scientists but often functioned more as rapists, sex tourists, and torture, not as outliers but as a regular part of colonial life. Liz also talks about her experience in organizing a grad worker union and building hope in the academia, teaching, community, landing fellowships, and what's next! Don't miss this terrific interview with the one and only Liz Polcha! Projects mentioned in the podcast: Early Caribbean Digital Archive https://ecda.northeastern.edu/ Women Writers Project https://www.wwp.northeastern.edu/ Articles and Books mentioned in the episode: "The Origin of Others" by Toni Morrison https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/34758228-the-origin-of-others "Mama's Baby, Papa's Maybe: An American Grammar Book" Hortense J. Spillers https://people.ucsc.edu/~nmitchel/hortense_spillers_-_mamas_baby_papas_maybe.pdf "Venus in Two Acts" Saidiya Hartman https://myelms.umd.edu/courses/1224150/files/46327971/download?download_frd=1 "Dispossessed Lives: Enslaved Women, Violence, and the Archive" by Marisa J Fuentes https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/28561909-dispossessed-lives Other Shout-out: "Colored Conventions: Bringing 19th Century Black Organizing To Digital Life" http://coloredconventions.org/ The Breaking History podcast is a production of the Northeastern University History Graduate Student Association. Producers and Sound Editors: Matt Bowser and Dan Squizzero Theme Music: Kieran Legg Today's hosts were: Thanasis Kinias, Molly Nebiolo, Jamie Parker, and James Robinson
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Join us as we talk with PhD Candidate Olivier Schouteden as we talk about French imperialism's explorers in late 19th century Indochina. How did these private adventurers interact with local people, the French imperial state, and how much control did the central state have over these people? What is an "explorer"? What does it say about the weaknesses of French imperialism, and how the French state eventually tried to reel them in? Olivier walks us through his dissertation and how the image of the explorer animated the spatial French imperial project, state-backed and private scientific societies, no matter the cost and resistance of people of present day Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. We even see one explorer, Charles-Marie David de Mayréna, set up his own rogue country in the middle of madness: Kingdom of Sedang (the basis of the novel Heart of Darkness, set in Central Africa, which became Apocalypse Now, returning to Indochina.) Olivier talks about his research adventures in the archives in France, Cambodia, and Vietnam, looking at letters and papers of french explorers, his experience with teaching, and what's next. Books mentioned in the episode: "Out of Our Minds: Reason and Madness in the Exploration of Central Africa" by Johannes Fabian https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/859138.Out_of_Our_Minds "The Coldest Crucible: Arctic Exploration and American Culture" by Michael F. Robinson https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2091360.The_Coldest_Crucible "Heroes of Empire: Five Charismatic Men and the Conquest of Africa" by Edward Berenson https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8717661-heroes-of-empire "The Road to Botany Bay: An Exploration of Landscape and History" by Paul Carter https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2854657-the-road-to-botany-bay "The Paper Road: Archive and Experience in the Botanical Exploration of West China and Tibet" by Erik Mueggler https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11694721-the-paper-road "The Trouble with Empire: Challenges to Modern British Imperialism" by Antoinette Burton https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/26262770-the-trouble-with-empire "Colonial Cambodia's 'Bad Frenchmen'" by Gregor Mueller https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/16780270-colonial-cambodia-s-bad-frenchmen "Of Rats, Rice, and Race: The Great Hanoi Rat Massacre, an Episode in French Colonial History" Michael G. Vann (future book) https://muse.jhu.edu/article/42110 The Breaking History podcast is a production of the Northeastern University History Graduate Student Association. Producers and Sound Editors: Matt Bowser and Dan Squizzero Theme Music: Kieran Legg
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Join us as we talk to Dave DeCamp as he talks about his dissertation work and animal imagery in the British Empire's self-imagination: "The Elephant in the Room: Empire, Animals, and Popular Culture in Interwar London". From the household to the tube station, imperial influence at home was one of the many sites where empire was re-imagined and rearticulated. Dave's dissertation focuses use of exotic animal imagery in London’s popular culture during the interwar. This animal imagery is significant to understanding the ways humans represent non-humans, other humans as non-humans, and the disconnect between the imagined and experienced geographies of empire. Dave also talks about his work in the Digital Scholarship Group at Northeastern, the "Our Marathon" project on the Boston Marathon bombings, and Digital Humanities. He gives his advice for surviving a PhD program. Books mentioned in podcast: Propaganda and Empire: The Manipulation of British Public Opinion, 1880-1960 by John M. MacKenzie https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2226036.Propaganda_and_Empire Imperial Cities: Landscape, Display and Identity by David Gilbert (Editor) https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1578443.Imperial_Cities An Introduction to Animals and Visual Culture by Randy Malamud https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13722019-an-introduction-to-animals-and-visual-culture The Animal Estate: The English and Other Creatures in Victorian England by Harriet Ritvo https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1502905.The_Animal_Estate The Nature of the Beasts: Empire and Exhibition at the Tokyo Imperial Zoo by Ian Jared Miller https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/13277124-the-nature-of-the-beasts Showing seeing: a critique of visual culture W.J.T. Mitchell https://www.nyu.edu/classes/bkg/methods/mitchell.pdf The Right to Look Nicholas Mirzoeff http://nicholasmirzoeff.com/RTL/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/RTL-from-CI.pdf The Breaking History podcast is a production of the Northeastern University History Graduate Student Association. Producers and Sound Editors: Matt Bowser and Dan Squizzero Theme Music: Kieran Legg
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Join Simon, James, Adam, Chuck, and Huseyin Kurt as we interview Matt Bowser about his dissertation, "Misdirected Rage: The Origins of Islamophobia in Burma, 1930-1948", that takes a deep historical dive into the roots of the current crisis in Myanmar. We take a look at the late colonial period in Burma in the 1930s. Matt's argument looks at the anti-colonial movement between the socialists and the ultra-nationalists who scape-goated the Muslim population in order to gain power, with the encouragement of the British authorities. Matt talks about his academic path looking at empires, and we riff on the tactics of ultra-nationalists, including the fascist U Saw, in their struggle for leadership of the anti-colonial struggle against the socialists. Matt connects the code-words of "Muslim" for blaming Indians without blaming the British. He talks his about theory on co-colonialism, as wealthy Indians ruled Burma economically through the British, even as working class Indians came into the country for work. How did it play out on the ground? How is the 1938 anti-muslim riots connect to how genocide has happened in Myanmar, targeted at Muslims? How does this play out elsewhere? What happens afterwards, during WWII and the Cold War? We also hear about Bowser's research journeys and methods in navigating in a charged political climate to dig up potentially sensitive history in Myanmar. Books to read for more information! Regarding the Rohingya: Ibrahim, Azeem. The Rohingyas: Inside Myanmar’s Hidden Genocide. New Delhi: Speaking Tiger Publishing, 2017. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/26717021-the-rohingyas Regarding Buddhism and colonial Burma: Turner, Alicia. Saving Buddhism: The Impermanence of Religion in Colonial Burma. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2017. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22828775-saving-buddhism Regarding Indian Ocean world: Aiyar, Sana. Indians in Kenya: The Politics of Diaspora. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2015. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/25401212-indians-in-kenya Amrith, Sunil S. Crossing the Bay of Bengal: The Furies of Nature and the Fortunes of Migrants. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2013 https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17804366-crossing-the-bay-of-bengal The Breaking History podcast is a production of the Northeastern University History Graduate Student Association. Producers and Sound Editors: Matt Bowser, Cassie Cloutier, and Dan Squizzero Theme Music: Kieran Legg Today's hosts were: Simon Purdue, James Robinson , Chuck Clough, Adam Tomasi, Huseyin Kurt twitter: @BreakingHistPod
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